A little 38 histroy for our friend Ryo

Interesting history here ryo that involves competion between Colt and Smith and Wesson. On previous cartriges Colt had introduced both the .32 and .38 cartridges, and S&W had countered with improved balistics on both rounds by using larger cases, and keeping the same caliber. The S&W was the prefered in both calibers and of course Colt didn't want to credit S&W so usually used the police prefix to denote a Colt with S&W improved cartridges. eg. I have a couple of .32 Colt revolvers. and these were forruners of the .32 Colt police, which is in .32 S&W. The original army 38 was .38 Colt, and as know by all a dismal failure. While S&W developed what is today the .38 special, (this was at the turn of the century and of course the early days of smokeless powder) Colt developed the .45 ACP that were all so familure with, and concentrated on automatics for government contracts. The 38 special that became the standard 38, is actually .357 in measurment but that was never used until 1935 when S&W came out with the .357 magnumm cartridge they did exactly as ecaman stated, extending the 38 cartridge, and calling it for the first time .357 mag. How the Europeans developed the 9mm and its derivitives, first being the 9mm kurtz, then going the other way and extending the cartridge length also has a facinating history, but thats for a later time, or someone who (hopefully) spells better than your friend greg. One of the interesting things is that while all the bullets will interchange between .38 and 9mm. the 9mm is actaully .355.. I have always speculated why on both sides of the Atlantic calibers of the same dimension were developed, and can only assume that this had to do with the expense of boring and rifling bbls. I have never heard good evidence otherwise. One final note Ryo, as ecaman stated how you deal with your disability is both humbling and impresive. I think were all a little better due to your input, and what ever you deal with, the Lord has blessed you with wisdom and intelect beyond the norm. For that you can be proud.. We are of you!

4 Comments

5 years 22 weeks ago, 1:34 PM

Ironkoji

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Greg az, Thank you.

This is exactly the sort of thing why I approve of my boys coming to this forum. It's because there are kind people who come here, who seem not only willing, but in you case even eager to teach them things they can know and use as I raise them to be law abiding, respectful and caring citizens who will honor, appreciate and defend their Second Amendment Rights. The boys are new to learning about revolvers and pistols. Things like this little article that teach them real history and real facts are greatly appreciated by this old man.
I am also grateful to you for your kindness, patience and understanding of my oldest boy's handicapping condition. Your encouragement and enthusiasm warm this rotting old heart of mine. I will make sure to point this article out to both of my boys. There is information in it they will find useful and practical.
I don't know if Ryo kun has told you or not, but I'm allowing him to make a purchase of a special rifle he will find useful on our expedition into the Tibetan Plateau in January - March of 2011. It's been since I got the boys those Bul 5s of there's that I've made a purchase of a firearm for my younger boy Ryu. I'm looking for a pistol for him. Perhaps you could find the time to discuss this with me? I'd be grateful for your input. Also to give you a starting point, he's shown interest in another 9mm weapon, the H&K P 30.

Koji

5 years 22 weeks ago, 2:11 PM

greg az

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Father of three girls, and know what great work you've done by Ryo's attitute and respect. His posts re: mountainering, and his heritage, are incredable, and informative. For what it's worth i find it interesting that I am your oposite in weapon skill. I have never been beyond an average shot with a rifle, and was given my first .22 single shot at age 11, on the other hand was always a "natural" with a handgun, and can still shoot some tight (and fast) groups. My thoughts on the P-30 mirror all others. I believe it to be close to the final evolution of the handgun. Obviously 9mm is the perfect start point. Hope you and the familyy have a great holiday my friend.

a man has to hold his word, hold his beliefs, and hold a good sight picture.
5 years 22 weeks ago, 3:00 PM

Ironkoji

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My sons have always regretted not having a sister. Two boys is almost more than I can handle. I can well imagine though what it was like for you to have raised three girls. I still maintain that being a parent is the toughest job in the world. I can recall many times that I'd have much rather faced an enemy in the field than either of my sons.
I also find it interesting that, as you say, we are opposites in our abilities with firearms. I'm left handed, but right eye dominant, so shooting a rifle right handed seems very natural to me. My younger boy is also left handed, but he shoots rifles right handed. He does not seem to have my problem with handguns. I make no excuses, with a pistol or revolver I'm a rotten shot. I kind of find it funny to be raising two boys who have suddenly shown such real interest in learning the skills necessary to use handguns properly. I am proud of both of my boys and please forgive the proud father mode here, but I'm particularly proud of Ryu kun's abilities as a qualified expert marksman, and a champion, in his age group, rifleman. He's got nerve and skills and I believe a God given talent for shooting rifles at the competition levels he qualifies for also. I am also proud of my oldes boy Ryo, for many of the qualities you admire in him. I've done my best by both of them, even though, I know, there are times when I feel I'm a miserable failure as a parent.
I've never regretted my choice about remarrying. There just isn't another woman out there, for me, who can compare with my wife. I never bought into the idea of, "Till death do us part". As far as I'm concerned, we are still married. Your input on the P 30 is gratefully appreciated. My son has looked this weapon over, just this past weekend in fact, at the gun shop where we do business. I'm a lifelong friend of the owner, and I knew his father really well too. In fact I learned to shoot from both him and my father. My father even though he's just turned 82 is still quite the marksman, and he's practically a genius at spotting. I was very grateful to him too, for taking my oldest boy under his wing and teaching him the skills of a good spotter. There was a time when we just didn't know if my oldest boy would ever be able to shoot, but as is typical of him, he found ways to compensate. Instead of feeling sorry for himself, he dived right into learning spotting and from an early age he showed almost a fanatical interest in Gun Range Management and Range safety proceedures and skills. I was very proud of him that day back in September of this year when he graduated from the two year long program our gun club offers to young people who show interest in Range Management and Range Safety. He received the highest marks in his class and a certificate for his graduation, and I also had an agreement with him, that if he did graduate, then I would buy him the rifle of his choice.
At first he wanted a Lapua Class semi automatic rifle, but there are only two available on the market right now, and he didn't like either one of them. So, as an experiment my younger boy tried to teach him how to shoot a bolt action rifle. This didn't work out too well. The damage to his brain stem is quite severe and sometimes it will send the right signals he's asking for in order to perform some physical task and sometimes it just won't. He just cannot make his right hand do the motions necessary to operate a 4 position bolt action rifle. We tried everything. I tried as well as my younger boy who has infinitely more patience than I do. He looks up to his older brother almost in awe. Try as we might, Ryo's brain stem just refused to cooperate. He was not disappointed. In fact he did get the rifle he really wanted in place of the Lapua.
He and his brother did a series of picture articles on the site here about the Swedish made, FFV AK 5B, which also included the version he wanted, the most expensive one I might add. He asked for the Saab/Bofors AK 5B Basic Designated Marksman's Rifle. I agreed even knowing I was going to have to borrow part of the money from my father to help pay for it. I don't like putting things like this on lawaway or making time payments either, although my friend at the gun shop would have gladly accommodated me. When a month later, I was able to pay my father back, he refused to accept the money. I tried even putting it in his wallet one night after he'd gone to bed. I found the money on my night stand by my bed the next morning. Cranky old geezer isn't he? My son got his rifle and he's so very proud of it, even though he loves the little Walther G22 bullpup, which was his first rifle, even more. My son has an ongoing fascination with bullpup class rifles. A thing our design team has found extremely useful.
His brother saw this rifle and commented that it was so good, they believe it to be the very best AK style weapon ever built, and I admit it is in the top three of those for sure. However, he didn't ask for one just like it, and my wallet gave an almost audible sigh of relief. Instead he asked for another pistol to add to the two he already owns. Something that can be uniquely his. The boys admire each others weapons, but they are highly individual and like to have different things of their own, even though the two pistols they each have now are identical except in the different colors of the two Ruger 22 Chargers. The carrying cases for their Bul 5s each have their names on the outside. Inside the two weapons are identical, even though the boys can tell them apart.
I am giving serious consideration to this P 30 for my younger boy. It's not expensive. It's a very finely made, high quality pistol, as you'd expect from anything from H&K. Thank you for your input on this. I have also found out that the P 30 can fire the extended 9mm x 21mm, and x 22mm rounds as well as the 9 x 19 classice parabellum round. You cannot fire the 9mm x 23mmSP round from this weapon however because the chamber is not certified to handle the extremly high pressure this largest of the class round produces. My son also likes the weight and heft of the pistol in his hand and the accessory kit that comes with the full purchase. I'm not fully committed to this pistol yet, as there are one or two other pistols my younger boy has shown interest in, but when he makes up his mind, rest assured I have no problem with making a purchase like this for him. It's less than a seventh of what that infernal AK 5 cost. If that's what's going to make him happy; that's fine by me.
Again thank you for the interest and caring you have shown for my sons.

Koji

5 years 18 weeks ago, 3:51 AM

CharlesW

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pistol shooting

My long dead grandpa taught me a trick
about pistol shooting. If you learn to
point your finger at an object and get
your minds eye to cooperate you will
learn to point right at it. Once you
have concured this you can bend that finger
around a trigger and not change anything.
I always point and shoot, I never aim a
hand gun. But I've been shooting over 50 years.
Another thing you might try using a 22 pistol
for targets. You get to shoot 5 times as much
for the ammo cost.

In my own openion the 9MM is totally useless. Not
much better than a .380 and less than a 38 spl.
The only advantage I see is the 9 comes in an
auto so you have more fire power than with a
revolver.
My life is worth no less than a 38spl but I carry
a .357 unless I'm in the woods, then it's the
Ruger 44 mag

A little rebellion is good medicine for the government Thomas Jefferson

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