Ruger Redhawk

Ruger’s Redhawk .44 Magnum revolver, introduced in 1979, was, in the words of Ruger promotional materials, “an entirely new firearm, representing the most significant advance in the development of heavy-frame double action revolvers in many decades.” The new gun’s lineage was quite clear: the Redhawk shared with its predecessor, the Security Six, a solid frame with disassembly via a removable trigger guard, a button-type cylinder release, a transfer-bar ignition system and many styling similarities.
There were innovations, too, however. While front cylinder lockup in the Security Six utilized the traditional spring-loaded plunger that engaged the recessed tip of the ejector rod, front lockup in the Redhawk was accomplished by a crane-mounted front latch that engaged a slot in the frame in the area below the barrel threads. Also new was the Redhawk’s offset ejector rod, which permitted more meat in the frame around the barrel threads as well as the use of a larger barrel thread designation, both of which increased gun strength. Other changes included a new cylinder latch system; interchangeable front sight blades with different-colored plastic inserts and the use of a single coil spring to power both trigger and hammer.
Originally issued in 410-series stainless steel with a walnut grip and a 7 1/2" barrel, the Redhawk soon became available in a 5 1/2" barrel length and in blued steel. In 1984, both .357 Magnum and .41 Magnum models were brought out, which were produced through 1991. Since its introduction a number of variants have been produced, mostly resulting from changes in sighting rib width, hammer pivot tab location and ejector. Currently, Ruger catalogs models in .44 Mag. and .45 Colt with either 5 1/2" or 7 1/2" barrels. It is estimated that by the late 1990s, more than 300,000 Redhawks had been produced since the gun’s introduction.

4 Comments

5 years 7 weeks ago, 5:27 PM

PBR Driver

PBR Driver's picture

Rank:
Brigadier General
Points:
245
Join Date:
Oct 2009
Location:
Afton, Wyoming, United States
ruger

I have owned a lot of ruger handguns in the past. The older rugers are so much better quality than the new ones. The new ruger red hwacks are poorly fitted and not worthy of the name ruger.
Now I know there will be some that claim theirs are super great.
Let me give you reasons I am dissappointed in ruger.
I took a chance and bought a .44 red hawk. What lack of quality control this one had. The action felt like it had sand thrown into it. It took a lot of work to get it to feel some what smooth.
I am high on accuracy this .44 wanted to shoot but just could not put 6 rounds in the same ball park. When miking the chambers not one was even close to the other in other words the chambers were crooked.
Trigger felt like it was a mill bastard file. So on and so forth.
All my older rugers were very accurate and smooth right out of the box.
I sold my red hawk and bought another named revolver and have not looked back since.
If you like your ruger then by all means keep it and enjoy it, as for me I have left all my rugers on the used gun store shelves.

INDIVIDUAL LIBERTY NEVER GOES OUT OF STYLE. If you do not love the CONSTITUTION AS IT IS WRITTEN then you are free to leave MY COUNTRY at this time.
5 years 7 weeks ago, 5:54 PM

ecaman

ecaman's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
2613
Join Date:
Jul 2009
Location:
Payson, UT, United States
Ruger Revolvers

The only Ruger revolvers I've ever owned have been a 3-screw Super Single Six (5 1/2") that was pure fun to shoot with both cylindrs, a 3-screw Blackhawk (4 5/8") that was a great gun (very accurate, & tremendous fun to shoot), and 3 Security Sixes. The Security Sixes were all the original style. I had a 6" stainless that was the most accurate revolver I've ever owned, then a 2 3/4" stainless that I carried & kept by the bed. It was quite heavy to carry. I had a 4" blue that I bought for next to nothing, then sold for a profit. All were very good quality guns, but all were older production. I've shot, but never owned, GP-100's (none were as accurate as my least accurate Security Six), and one SP-101 (short barrel .357) that I really didn't care for. I didn't like the way it felt in my hand. The only Ruger revolver I'd be interested in now would be another Super Single Six, if I could find another 3-screw. I've never wanted a Redhawk. I don't like the way they feel in my hand - not comfortable at all. I've never tried them with Hogue grips; that might change my mind.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. (Mark Twain).
5 years 7 weeks ago, 6:23 PM

luckybychoice

luckybychoice's picture


Rank:
Secretary of the Treasury
Points:
6793
Join Date:
May 2009
Location:
United States
I have had good luck

with Ruger(if you call having them repair for free 2 different revolvers luck).One was a Blackhawk.357 w/4&5/8 barrel,i had my local gun shop send it to them and they did a trigger job and replaced the cylinder for no charge.The other was a .44 Super blackhawk w/4&5/8 barrel which twisted the barrel,so again off to Rugers repair shop and they replaced parts and fixed it up real nice,again no charge.I like the way they both felt and shot after the trip to the factory,both triggers are crisp and smooth.
I don't count on these pistols for anything but fun so i didn't mind taking the time to get them sent back and fixed otherwise i would of sold them and someone else would of just inherited the problem,had there been a charge to fix them i would have just traded them away though...maybe.
I did have a DanWesson w/7&1/2 barrel which had a lot of problems but once again i sent it to their repair shop and they fixed it,for a price,i got it back and sold it.LOL

i tried being reasonable,i didn't like it, NRA LIFE MEMBER,USMC VETERAN
5 years 7 weeks ago, 6:51 PM

ecaman

ecaman's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
2613
Join Date:
Jul 2009
Location:
Payson, UT, United States

My wife bought a Ruger RST4 in 1976. Great gun, except it always shot 1" left & 2" low. Grouped great. She didn't want to do anything to it, because it said "Made in the 200th Year of American Liberty" on the barrel. Later on I finally convinced her to let me put aftermarket adjustable sights on it. I wrote to Ruger to ask if they recommended Clark or Millett sights. They said I could just send it back to them & they would target it. After they got it, they called to tell me that there was a factory defect that they couldn't repair. They gave two choices. First, they'd send it back untouched. Second, they'd replace it free with a brand new, hand-selected MK4. They said that the RST4 barrel markings didn't affect the value at all, since they'd made so many. My wife finally decided that she'd accept the MK4. It arrived with a factory target, with the middle 1" shot out of the bullseye. When we took it out to shoot it, we were amazed. The target was no bullshit at all. I've never shot any handgun as accurate. At the time I had a T678 which I was quite proud of. When I shot them side by side I was so disgusted that I traded the T678 for a Super Single Six the next weekend. The MK4 is still my wife's pride & joy.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. (Mark Twain).

Recent Activity