Forums / Gun Discussion / Best armed soldier

4 years 28 weeks ago, 5:23 PM

CharlesW

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Best armed soldier

My dad will be 87 on 12-31-2009. He served in the US Army in WW11. His unit was the 86th Inf, They served in Italy,France and marched on Berlin, Germany. They were making ready to come home in late 45 but were assigned to the South Pacific for another year. I suppose he has battle experiance enough to answer this question. What are the best personal arms for the American soldier?
His answer
M1 Garand
1911 Colt
B.A.R
He did say he would have loved to have had a M79 granade launcher if there were enough people to carry the ammo.
My dad is familure with the more modern weapons issued but still would rather have the WW11 issue.
Any Opinions ?

A little rebellion is good medicine for the government Thomas Jefferson
4 years 28 weeks ago, 5:27 PM

daisycutter

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you're talking WW2.

iyaoyas
4 years 28 weeks ago, 5:32 PM

CharlesW

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Carbine

The M2 Carbine was full auto right? I trained
with them in ROTC but that was a lot of yrs ago lol

A little rebellion is good medicine for the government Thomas Jefferson
4 years 28 weeks ago, 5:43 PM

daisycutter

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B.A.R. even though the B.A.R. was not bad due to it's weight.

iyaoyas
4 years 28 weeks ago, 5:38 PM

zx12rmike

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I just want to thank your Dad for his work overseas, God Bless him.

"We cannot defend freedom abroad by deserting it at home" Thomas Jefferson
4 years 27 weeks ago, 11:06 PM

ecaman

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CharlesW

Please convey my thanks & my respect to your dad. I'm sure you're proud and thankful to have such a man for a father. He was a man of honor - and I'm sure he still is.
My father-in-law, Jack Linton, was in the Army when Pearl Harbor was bombed. He was sent to Australia to become one of the first in the Army of the Pacific. He then served in every major battle in the Pacific in which the Army was involved until the war was over. His children still honor his service and his character today.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. (Mark Twain).
4 years 27 weeks ago, 11:09 PM

daisycutter

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speak with. I enjoy listening to war vets telling how it was.

iyaoyas
4 years 27 weeks ago, 11:13 PM

daisycutter

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a tall glass of fiber and off to bed :<)) Being old is GREAT!!

iyaoyas
4 years 27 weeks ago, 11:24 PM

greg az

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If you have any way of doing it, sure would appreciate it if you could send my sincer respects to your Dad as well.. That generation is going, every Sunday we get the Phoenix paper, and seems like a third of the obits are from the greatest generation, and i think we all feel the same way. I would love just to sit down at a VFW somewhere, and but the old boys a drink and listen to them tell stories. Last time i got tires for the truck i stoped at Discount tires (big out west, have no idea if there nation wide), and old boy had a WWII hat on, and of course i got him to open up. WOW! i honestly hated it when he had to go.. He was Army aircorp, and still tough.. Tatts all weatherd to the point you couldn't read them. But he knew his Pratt and Whitneys, and his 50's.. I think with them going as quick as they are (hope yours has many many more Chuck) That congess should make the next decade a 10 year honor to those remaining..

a man has to hold his word, hold his beliefs, and hold a good sight picture.
4 years 27 weeks ago, 2:11 AM

CharlesW

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Army Air Corps

My mothers poor brother was drafted from
the Inf into the 101st Airborne Glider
Div and landed in Normandy on D-Day.They
lost 80% on landing as they came down in
a forest full of Germans
From Normandy he went to Bastone(Sp)
and it turned out to be the Battle of the Buldge.
Came home without a scratch as did my dad.
Lady luck smiled on them.

I just can't imagine being towed by a B-17
in a plywood aircraft.

The only way I learned anything about the
war was listening to them when I was a kid

A little rebellion is good medicine for the government Thomas Jefferson
4 years 27 weeks ago, 11:44 PM

ecaman

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Daisycutter

Unfortunately, my father-in-law passed away a few years ago. Thanks for your words about him. He was very reluctant to talk about his combat experiences to those who had none themselves. He would talk about other aspects of his time in the Army with most people, but not about combat. He was also a very modest man. He wouldn't talk about medals, honors, etc. He couldn't stand to be thought a braggart, & held those who were in total contempt. About the most he would say to most people was that he'd done his duty and that was enough.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. (Mark Twain).
4 years 27 weeks ago, 12:13 AM

greg az

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I had a friend who did the Salomon Islands, and he was the same way. He talked about the other landings, but would clam up when the subject of the Salomons came up, They went thru hell.

a man has to hold his word, hold his beliefs, and hold a good sight picture.
4 years 27 weeks ago, 12:27 AM

23 - 12 Bravo

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Solomon Islands.

My Dad was there. 1st Div. Marines L-3-5 Guadalcanal Etc. Got wounded on Peleliu but stayed for the duration. In '82 he took my mom with him to the 40th anniversary and was able to see some of his old cobbers. Even Sir Jacob Vousza was in attendance for the reunion. A few years after that they published a book called L-3-5 The Marines of Bloody Ridge. They mentioned my dad quite a bit in that book. He was always my hero. He passed away in '02. 60 years after the Guadalcanal landing. I miss him.

There's no reason to be the richest man in the cemetery. You can't do any business from there. -Colonel Sanders
4 years 27 weeks ago, 6:54 PM

runawaygun762

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Charles

Best arms of WW2, M1 Garand and Thompson. As for the glider troops, they were towed by the C47s, not the B17s. Glider troops didn't get any extra pay, either. Not that jump pay was truly enough to make it worth it, but at least in the airborne units, you were with volunteers and not draftees. Granted, there were good draftees, but I wouldn't want to be in one of those units.

"I have always been a soldier. I have known no other life. The calling of arms, I have followed from boyhood. I have never sought another." From The Virtues of War, by Steven Pressfield.
4 years 27 weeks ago, 12:10 AM

CharlesW

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runaway

As usual youre right guy, I stand corrected about
the B-17Like I said my dad and uncle didn't talk much
about the war unless they were together and
had a few on the weekend. Us kids were too young
to understand what they were really talking about
and didn't take notes on the information at hand.
My uncle is gone now but I still have my dad and
he talks to me freely about things now.
My dads unit, the 86th Infantry were the Black Hawks
and speer headed for Gen Patton.

A little rebellion is good medicine for the government Thomas Jefferson
4 years 27 weeks ago, 12:16 AM

CharlesW

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runaway

My dad drove a jeep pulling a 105 and
carried a Carbine, 2 Colts and 6
granades at all times. He laughs
now about when they set up the 105
a couple of guys would lay down on sand
bags on the out riggers and when it went
off they would get thrown in the air.

A little rebellion is good medicine for the government Thomas Jefferson
4 years 27 weeks ago, 12:25 AM

greg az

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23-12

I just read about your dad passing in 02, Lost mine in 96, I know what you mean about missing him. I have his pic up in my "man cave" a shed thats between the garage and the house. I can go out there and know im not gona be disturbed. Guessing about once a month I will pick up an old tool, or something that belonged to Dad, and get "sorta quiet" For a couple of min. I would not be what i am (not that thats anything, but better than what i woulda turned out) were it not for my Pop. You guys will like this since Lew and i are telling war stories. Christmas 67 I called home, (pop had written, and told me to write mom more as she worried, and being a goofy kid i didn't) Operator says (all excited) Sir you have a call from your son on our SE ASIA line. Pop says "is it collect" she says "well, yes sir" Pop says "Hell NO".. This was a bad subject that we couldn't even laugh about around mom almost 30 years later. Obviously she gave him some serious greif. That tough love made me grow up! God bless ya Pop, and God bless yours Bravo..

a man has to hold his word, hold his beliefs, and hold a good sight picture.
4 years 27 weeks ago, 12:29 AM

daisycutter

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my shop, about 40 yds away when I heard the overseas operator asking if the call was complete. Very quick thinking I said no and asked her to dial my Mom and Dad's number. We talked for almost a half hour, no charge.
Used to make radio telephone calls home sometimes but it was a pain in the ass...OVER. MARS radio.

iyaoyas
4 years 27 weeks ago, 12:43 AM

greg az

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If you remember the front opened up to the flight line, and you could spit to the single strip. You were talking about the MLG problem that caused a loss of life, if i remember there was NO extra room at either end of that strip. all just rock down to the ocean, and Corregador (sp?) on the far side. I remember we parked in the back, and you could walk from the hanger to a gedunk (on the flight line) that had good food, and cigs for a nickel a pack when i first got there (unfiltered) dime for filter. I'm a nonsmoker now, but remember we had a coupon for (forget the number) cartons, that we all made money on. The shops were all lined up in the back and on the side. Did ya ever take the launch to Manila? The exchange rate was 4peso's to a buck. and you could live well in those days..

a man has to hold his word, hold his beliefs, and hold a good sight picture.
4 years 27 weeks ago, 1:14 AM

23 - 12 Bravo

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Greg

I remember back in 79 when I decided to go into the service. Wanted to be a Marine just like dad was. He said no way in hell. It really surprised me because I thought he would be proud for me to follow in his footsteps. It was never open for discussion with him. He wanted me to go in the Coast Guard or the Air force. Im not sure really why he was against the idea. Maybe he felt I just wouldnt cut it, or he just didnt want me to wind up in some of the situations he had been in. Not sure. Anyways I served in the Air Force as a Crew Chief on Phantoms 79-84. Pretty easy duty really. I remember when I was a kid I always waited till he had a few beers and asked him for some war stories. Every once in awhile he would tell me a little about the landings, running out of ammo and fixing bayonets, the Japs in the jungle at night calling out "fukkie Babe Ruth". Never would give out any gorey details, which as a kid I wanted to hear. As I grew older and matured I felt bad always wanting to hear those stories, after all the way I see it now, if a man has lived through all that hell why would he ever want to remember it? Poor guy was probably just trying to forget it all. When I was around 30 years old I remember him sitting at the kitchen table one morning when I stopped by to visit. He confided in me for the first time in my life. Told me he had a bad night cause of a dream about Guadalcanal. He said every once in awhile he would have that. Then he shared a real war story with me. The kind of thing nightmares are made of. My God. 50 years later and he still had nightmares. When he was done he had me in tears. I think it helped him a little bit to talk about it. Ill always have deep respect for all the men that served in combat.

There's no reason to be the richest man in the cemetery. You can't do any business from there. -Colonel Sanders
4 years 27 weeks ago, 1:27 AM

CharlesW

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Bravo

When I told my dad in 1965 I had joined
the army he had tears in his eyes. He
said he had served enough for both his
boys and had hoped neither of us would
ever go into the service.

Mabe your dad felt the same way about his
service and you

A little rebellion is good medicine for the government Thomas Jefferson
4 years 27 weeks ago, 1:45 AM

23 - 12 Bravo

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Yeah.

Most likely. My son just turned 18 and hes talking about the Military. Ill support him in his decision but it still makes my gut hurt a little bit. I suppose its always like that. Maybe some more than others.

There's no reason to be the richest man in the cemetery. You can't do any business from there. -Colonel Sanders
4 years 27 weeks ago, 1:42 AM

runawaygun762

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He served in Vietnam and didn't talk to anyone about any of it. I lived two houses down with my grandparents while my dad was in Desert Storm and Uncle Bill never talked about it. Then when I got home from my second tour in Iraq, I stopped by his place with my wife, who I met in Iraq. I had my Bushmaster M4 with EO Tech and forend light on the rail system and 3 point sling and I let him toy with it. His eyes got great big, then he kinda furrowed his eyebrows, then looked at me and proclaimed "If we'd had shit like this, we'd have won that fuckin' war". Then we sat outside smoking, swapping war stories. I've carried the headless body of one of my buddies and picked up pieces of people off the street, and his definitely put mine to shame. There are things I wouldn't tell people who have never served, because most people who have never experienced the absurdity and sheer dumb luck of combat would never believe me. I think it was the same with Uncle Bill. I think he didn't want to talk to a dumb kid about those things because I wouldn't understand. But I think my two tours and some of the things I saw and feelings I experienced hit home and I think he felt like I'd understand without him having to go into specifics. It's a lot easier to use words like "stuff" or "bad things" than it is to describe them in detail so someone will know what you mean. What kills me nowadays is we seem to have a reverse stigma. In past wars, you were considered weak or unmanly if you went to a head doctor or if you cried. Nowadays, if you haven't gone to see the wizard, people assume you haven't experienced real combat. They hand out the PTSD diagnosis like crazy. I'm sorry, but it's not a disorder to go through the grieving process over lost friends, and it's not a disorder to have ocassional (does that word have one or two 'c'?) flashbacks and nightmares. It's natural. It's our coping mechanism. Hell, it took me over a year to cry about losing PV2 Evans. Then one day, out of nowhere, I started wondering if there was anything more I could have done to save him, and started bawling like a fucking baby, going into hysterics. That's not a disorder, it's natural. It's when you become unable to function on a daily basis that it becomes a disorder. Oh well, I went too long with this post. Fuck it. Blame it on the beer.

"I have always been a soldier. I have known no other life. The calling of arms, I have followed from boyhood. I have never sought another." From The Virtues of War, by Steven Pressfield.
4 years 27 weeks ago, 1:49 AM

CharlesW

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runaway

Blame it on the muslim terrorist
Kill Em All Let God Sort Em Out

A little rebellion is good medicine for the government Thomas Jefferson
4 years 27 weeks ago, 2:03 AM

CharlesW

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drum mag

Did yall see the 40 round drum mag
I posted for the 1911 Colt?
Bad Bitch lol

A little rebellion is good medicine for the government Thomas Jefferson
4 years 27 weeks ago, 1:49 AM

runawaygun762

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I wanted to go into the delayed entry program for the army at 17, but had to have both parents' signatures. My dad, 22 years army, said no way, I'd hate the army, it wasn't what I thought it would be. So I told him either sign now, or the day I turn 18, I join the Marine Corps. I guess he decided the army was the lesser of the two evils. I often wonder what life would have been like as a jarhead.

"I have always been a soldier. I have known no other life. The calling of arms, I have followed from boyhood. I have never sought another." From The Virtues of War, by Steven Pressfield.
4 years 27 weeks ago, 1:56 AM

CharlesW

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runaway

Having had a dad who served In Europe
and the South Pacific and an uncle who
was Air Borne Glider I felt my duty to
serve. I took 4 years of high school ROTC
and right after graduation signed up
Then I find out I have a bad heart and
was released from service in the middle
of AIT at Ft Polk in 65. They gave me
a General Under Honerable Conditions
since it was prior service.
I still feel bad I couldn't serve.

A little rebellion is good medicine for the government Thomas Jefferson
4 years 27 weeks ago, 1:57 AM

23 - 12 Bravo

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True.

Alot of the oldtimers Ive heard describe their combat experiences use terms like "Ya, they opened up on us and it was a real mess" and I cant help but think what an understatement! But what the hell, they know what they mean and its good enough for them. Like I said, I have nothing but deep respect for all you men that served in combat.

There's no reason to be the richest man in the cemetery. You can't do any business from there. -Colonel Sanders

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