Forums / Political & Legal / FIREARMS TREATY, THAT OBAMA WANTS RATIFIED BY CONGRESS

5 years 24 weeks ago, 6:04 PM

bosshog

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In a stunningly clever move, president Barack Obama, speaking from Mexico, announced support for an international firearms treaty that could have far-reaching effects on U.S. gun ownership -- without needing to pass legislation and deal with normal congressional representation. See item #1 in Page Nine below. If ratified by the Senate, the treaty, which is already written, would become law and supercede even the U.S. Constitution, as specified in the Constitution itself (Art. VI).
I have obtained a copy of the 4,078-word treaty and have begun to study it; it has numerous conditions whose effects are unclear and could depend in large measure on how they are interpreted and applied. It appears that the conditions will require binding regulations to implement, which would be written by faceless bureaucrats and be relatively immune to legislative process or full public review. As soon as possible I will be releasing an analysis of the Inter-American Convention Against The Illicit Manufacturing Of And Trafficking In Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives, And Other Related Materials, which you can download here: http://www.oas.org/juridico/English/treaties/a-63.html
This opening requirement could presumably be fulfilled in almost any way, to satisfy an anti-rights interpretation of the treaty: "Art. IV, 1. States Parties that have not yet done so shall adopt the necessary legislative or other measures to establish as criminal offenses under their domestic law the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials." "Trafficking" is not explicitly limited by "illicit" and could mean almost anything.

5 years 24 weeks ago, 6:11 PM

bosshog

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MEXICO CITY – Confronting a security threat on America's doorstep, President Barack Obama pledged Thursday in Mexico to help a deeply troubled neighbor in its battle against drugs and violence, including action to slow the dangerous flow of weapons from the United States.
"At a time when the Mexican government has so courageously taken on the drug cartels that have plagued both sides of the border," Obama said, the U.S. must join "in dealing with the flow of guns and cash south."
Obama spoke at the start of a swift visit to underscore U.S. solidarity.
Mexican President Felipe Calderon welcomed Obama to the presidential residence, Los Pinos, with an acknowledgment of the challenges: "My country is immersed in a historic transformation process. We live a robust democracy, which is also plural. We're also facing firmly the costs of the struggles in order to turn Mexico into a safer country."
He cited a visit a half-century ago by President John F. Kennedy in calling for a new era of cooperation between the countries.
"We will recognize that in order to grow and prosper, Mexico needs the United States investment and the United States of America needs the strength of the Mexican labor force," Calderon said.
After his meeting with Calderon, Obama planned to announce he would support an inter-American weapons treaty meant to take on the bloody drug trade. Officials described the plan on the condition of anonymity so they wouldn't pre-empt the announcement.
Just hours before Obama arrived in the country, a shootout between Mexican troops and a convoy of gunmen left 15 assailants and one soldier dead, Mexico's Defense Department said.
The Justice Department says Mexican drug trafficking organizations represent the greatest organized crime threat to the United States.
The Organization of American States adopted the weapons treaty in 1997 as a way to curtail dealing in illicit firearms throughout Latin America. Since then, 33 countries have signed the treaty, and 24 have ratified it. Former President Bill Clinton signed the treaty on Nov. 14, 1997, one day after it was endorsed by the OAS.
The Clinton administration submitted the 13-page treaty to the Senate for ratification the following year, but it has languished in the Foreign Relations Committee without action since then.
Clinton said at the time that the treaty would "advance important U.S. government interests and would enhance hemispheric security by obstructing the illicit flow of weapons to criminals such as terrorists and drug traffickers."
Countries ratifying the treaty agree to make the manufacture or trafficking in illegal firearms a criminal offense, to track the export, import and transit of all firearms and to share information with law enforcement officials in other countries who are investigating arms trafficking.
Officials said Obama would push lawmakers to act on it — an opening gesture for meetings in Mexico that also would include discussion of the economic crisis and possibly clean energy.
Among the other touchy points are disagreement over a lapsed U.S. assault weapons ban, a standoff over cross-border trucking, and immigration.
Presidential spokesman Robert Gibbs said Obama also would tell Mexican officials that he has asked Congress to provide money for Black Hawk helicopters to help Mexico in its drug war.
The escalating drug fight in Mexico is spilling into the United States, and confronting Obama with an international crisis much closer than North Korea or Afghanistan. Mexico is the main hub for cocaine and other drugs entering the U.S., and the United States is the primary source of guns used in Mexico's drug-related killings.
Calderon's aggressive stand against drug cartels has won him the aid of the United States and the prominent political backing of Obama — never as evident as on Thursday, when the new president was to stand with Calderon in Mexico's capital city.
Interviewed Wednesday by CNN en Espanol, Obama said Calderon was doing a "heroic job" in his battle with the cartels.
As for the U.S. role, Obama said, "We are going to be dealing not only with drug interdiction coming north, but also working on helping to curb the flow of cash and guns going south."
Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said consultations with Mexico are "not about pointing fingers, it's about solving a problem: What can we do to prevent the flow of guns and cash south that fuel these cartels?"
Obama's overnight Mexican stop came on the way to the Summit of the Americas in the two-island Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago, where he hopes to set a new tone for relations with Latin America.
"We will renew and sustain a broader partnership between the United States and the hemisphere on behalf of our common prosperity and our common security," he wrote in an Op-ed column printed in a dozen newspapers throughout the region.
In the past, Obama said, America has been "too easily distracted by other priorities" while leaders throughout the Americas have been "mired in the old debates of the past."
More than 10,000 people have been killed in Mexico in drug-related violence since Calderon's stepped-up effort against the cartels began in 2006. The State Department says contract killings and kidnappings on U.S. soil, carried out by Mexican drug cartels, are on the rise as well.
Obama has dispatched hundreds of federal agents, along with high-tech surveillance gear and drug-sniffing dogs, to the Southwest to help Mexico fight drug cartels. He sent Congress a war-spending request that made room for $350 million for security along the U.S.-Mexico border. He added three Mexican organizations to a list of suspected international drug kingpins. He dispatched three Cabinet secretaries to Mexico. And he just named a "border czar."
The White House is vowing more enforcement of gun laws. But it is not pursuing a promise Obama made as a candidate: a ban on assault-style weapons.
That ban on military-style guns became law during the Clinton administration in 1994 but expired under the Bush administration in 2004. When Attorney General Eric Holder raised the idea of reinstating the ban this year, opposition from Democrats and Republicans emerged quickly.
The swooning economy, blamed largely on failures inside the United States, has taken a huge toll on Mexico. About 80 percent of Mexico's exports — now in decline — go to the United States.
Obama and Calderon are likely to tout the value of that trade, but a spat between their countries remains unresolved. Mexico has raised tariffs on almost 90 American products, a retaliation for a U.S. decision to cancel access to Mexican truckers on U.S. highways despite the terms of a free trade agreement.
On immigration, Obama is expected to make clear he is committed to reforms. The effort is likely to start this year but won't move to the top of his agenda.
"It's important because of the human costs," Obama said in the CNN en Espanol interview. "It's something that we need to solve."

5 years 24 weeks ago, 7:45 PM

DEMO

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The republicans are very poor at communicating their facts while the democrats are master maketing geniouses. I am amazed at the propagagnda the democrats market to people. They have marketed America as the villain nation which creates problems. This amazes me that the democrats could create an issue such as the Mexican assault rifle issue in order to justify violating the 2A. Its very depressing the media and democratic party can justify insane issues.
The enhanced interogation issue is also a joke. Self preservation of the nation is another issue the Bush administration had correct but media and dems shit on. If another attack hits us it will be on Obama and the dems, media.
Allowing palistinians to immigrate here is another shit Bill along with the 7 trillion in handouts to healthcare and other nations is a deception we can not live with.

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do
5 years 23 weeks ago, 10:15 PM

undeniable

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DEMO

Who wrote this? They are of course greatly mis-informed. The majority of the weapons found in Mexico have not come from these U.S.A. I saw a deal on C.N.N.(Had to see what the other side was up too) that showed R.P.G.s and fully automatic M-16s that they said were purchased in these United States by citizens and then sent south. There is a huge campaign of lies against honest citizens here and a source for this latest transgretion would be nice.

"The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn't exist." Kevin Spacey: (The Usual Suspects)
5 years 22 weeks ago, 12:06 PM

bosshog

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DEMO,
IM NOT GREATLY MIS-INFORMED, THIS HAS BEEN ON LOU DOBBS AND SEVERAL OTHER TO BACK DOOR GUN CONTROL, AND BACK DOOR THE 2ND.
THE FBI CAME OUT AT THE SAME TIME THAT CLINTON WAS SAYING THAT 90% OF THE GUNS IN MEXICO CAME FROM THE U.S.,,, WHEN ITS APPOX. 17% FBI
NOW THIS TREATY HAS BEEN AROUND SINCE BILL CLINTON WAS PRESIDENT AND HE DID IN FACT SIGN IT BUT CONGRESS DIDN'T RATIFY IT.
NOW OBAMA HAS IT AND HE WAS CONGRESS TO RATIFY IT SO HE CAN SIGN IT, THIS TREATY HAS BEE TALKED ABOUT ON TV 39 OTHER COUNTRIES HAVE ALL READY SIGNED IT AND IF WE DON'T WRITE OUR CONGRESSMAN IT COULD SLIP RIGHT THROUGH.
NOW YOU HAVE OBAMA, CLINTON, AND ALL THE GUN CONTROLL PUSHING THIS.

LOOK UP THE TREATY I HAVE AND I HAVE READ IT IF PASSED THEY CAN PUT A LOT OF GUN CONTROL IN PLACE.

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