Forums / Off Topic / I need a bit of advice.

3 years 35 weeks ago, 3:14 PM

Snake

Snake's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant General
Points:
1514
Join Date:
Nov 2010
Location:
Haysi, Virginia, United States

As of right now with the help of the good lord I will be tearing down a house at one place and building it at another. The house will be mine if things go as planned but I am not gonna swear to it yet as I am currently negotiating with the people that currently own it. They want the house removed so they can put in a trailer. The house is pretty old but structurally solid. This is my summer plans to move the house from point A to point B and rebuild it. However it will not be the same design as it sit now. Gonna add my personal touch to it in the design as I will be living in it once completed. I cant say that the house will be finished by the end of summer as I am flying solo on the tear down and rebuild. Really I would like it to remain a solo effort on this anyways. I want to see if I can accomplish a major build on my own.

Here is my question. I am not educated in the building of a foundation on uneven ground. The place I am building it basically slopes down hill so I need advice on making a foundation that will counter the slope and make the house perfectly level.

My idea was to make a "U" shaped like Block wall at the slope and fill it in with slate type rock. Then lay a few blocks to build the flooring frame on to keep the house off the ground. But I cant swear to that Idea actually working.

Any advice or techniques would greatly be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man.-Ronald Reagan
3 years 35 weeks ago, 4:15 PM

jay sedler

jay sedler's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant General
Points:
1546
Join Date:
Oct 2009
Location:
redding, california, United States
snake

this is a major operation even for a team of guys.you need to remember there are trusses or rafters to be removed before any walls can come down,this may require a crane or at least a few friends.when removing walls are you going to try to take them in whole sections or strip them down to lumber and basicly just recycle building materials?if you are going to try to move them as units they will be large and heavy!probably too large to move without a truck and crane.as far as the foundation goes,and for the whole project really you need to conform to local building codes.here in northern california we typicaly pour slabs,but for a standard floor you will need to pour footings and stemwals.again check your code,depth of footing will change depending on your slope and frostline if any exists in your area.i do concrete for a living,and i can tell you its allot of work just to dig the footings,set the forms bend and tie the reebar.its important the bottom or your footings are flat and level all the way around,so your house dosnt slide down the hill over time(especialy in earthquake areas,and areas with heavy rainfall).basicly its allot of work,not saying you cant do it, just its a huge undertaking even for a group of guys that do this kind of work all the time.remember error on the side of caution,you only get one chance to do it right the first time.have fun,and good luck!

CRY HAVOC and let slip the dogs of war!
3 years 35 weeks ago, 5:35 PM

Anonymous

Snake

A couple of things to consider. 1- Can you get the foundation in and all inspections and have the house moved for a reasonable price. Especially if it is a freebie to get rid of? #2- If you move house, I am sure the new way you are going to rebuld it will probably need a different foundation blueprint, unless it is a slab job, then just call the local bldg inspectors and those guys are very helpful. You may have to have a perk test for water and sewage and water table and even a sinkhole site job for future ins and bldg codes. If you do end up with a mortgage you should and will be expected to have homeownerinsurance. That as you know depending on state will or can be more expensive than the mortgage. But the mortgager will expect Ins, which still leaves you with PITI and in the area you move/build may be a homeowners association fee every year, added on to the ins and PITI, county parks zoning and bldg Height, in case of fire and the only thing in town is a bunch of volunteers that are great but if you have three stories and there biggest truck only goes two stories high it is obvious.

You really have to check it out, all and every aspect of it. If it was me and I did not know that much, I would attend a couple of county board meetings and take in all you can, then request if this type of project has ever been done before their, and ask for records, a copy of course. Then for a little experience, volunteer a couple of days at a Habitat for Humanity or type of building that is always being done somewhere and work right alongside of some of the best in all trades and do not be afraid to ask and become friends with these guys, as they are always willing to help for a sandwhich and a beer. Just like you are doing by helping out whatever project they are on. It comes right back at you when you volunteer your labor for a good cause.

But moving the house and having it set right on the foundation may work out better than tearing down and hauling and rebuilding, you can always rebuild after house is on your land or add to it, and keep that in mind when pouring foundation. You are asking for a lot of headaches and time and work, and I got to admire you for that. Not many would take on such a task,without that much experience. However, have you heard about the new Block houses, and I do not mean concrete or cinder block, and remember that name cinder block because that cannot be used in a lot of places now, it is the old stuff. The new Block homes are you pour slab, and then a crane comes out for a week depending on how big, but they work fast. The house is literrally a 4'x4' x4' cube of insulation and fiberboard, with metal studs already in place at 24" a part and the cubes are stacked and windows and doors all openings already cut out and wiring and pipe for plumbing holes are precut, so you punch them out as needed. After stacking and windows are in and doors, everything is tied together with metal and stuccoed on outside with wire and real stucco not a stucco look glazing. Then they put roof on and leave. The sheetrock and finish trim and baths is up to you. They will also finish the 2 car garage so it is livable while you pay or do the rest of home. Remember Kitchen cabinets and tops and flooring. But even garage doors are installed with a side door if you choose to live on site while home is being finished. They are beautiful,energy efficent as you can get, any shape and size. In about ten days after foundation you can actually move in to the double garage w/ washer&dryer and Bath and refrigerator etc and save on paying to live while all work is being done from you and friends or guys out of work and will sheetrock for cash and do taping& finishing. It is endless the amenities like fireplaces and sunken living room and bedroom, or raised floor etc. A friend of mine in Florida bought a package for 183,000.00. 4bdr/3b/3cargar and took 19 months while living in garage and it was a two story. He spent another 103,000.00. to finish it. He sold his old home and i/2 acre in jersey for 300,000.00, and ended up with the new hose after 19 months and hard work and good people and 5acre lot, and saved the rent if he sold and moved into somewhere while this one was built. He built out buildings and fences for some cattle and a horse and owns this baby outright, and it is magnificent. I know everybody does not have that kind of money and are his age and sold his house for so much. But I give him a lot of credit, and his wife, and he is bored out of his skull now and retired. I am trying to get him to go in with me for a shooting range & it looks pretty good so far here in Florida, and if we open, any of you guys shoot for free when passing threw. ISD maybe you can peddle your wares ( leather there ) and shoot too. I am sorry about the damn book I write every time I know something I think is interesting. But Good luck Snake in whatever you do, because it is tough and I admire you for it. JLC

3 years 35 weeks ago, 5:44 PM

Snake

Snake's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant General
Points:
1514
Join Date:
Nov 2010
Location:
Haysi, Virginia, United States
Jay Sedler

Yes your right I need to go by the codes when building the house. This will be the biggest job I have ever taken in my life so I am gonna be extremley cautious when taking down the house. If I had the money I would hire someone to set the footings and build the foundation form me and the I would build the house after. As for you mentioning the Trusses yes those will have to be moved by me and a few other felleas. The house was built in the 20's so Im 50% sure that the trusses are light yet stout. Its a 1 story house. As for the wall I am stripping them to individual boards as I will be tweeking the design to my personal likings. I will be leaving only the kings studs together. However I will be taking the roof off before I attempt at the wall framing. I dont want to bring the house down on me.

I asked my carpentry teacher how would be the best way to start on tearing a house down board by board and he said " Start small, take interior doors off,moldings,receptacles,lights and wall panels out first. Basically strip the interior to the framing as well as the exterior and from there work from the roof down."

One thing I dread fighting with is that massive oil furnace in the basement. But my step dad called first dibs on it so thats his problem, but if he decides not to take it then that leaves it to me to fight with. I dont want it so I will probably put it up for sale by then.

As for the tin roof I may or may not use it. I may shingle the roof on my house. One thing I absolutley adore in that house is the fire place and chimney. Its original to the house and not one stone has been replaced in its 92+/- years. Bringing it down is gonna be tough but I am gonna do it professionally as I am saving every stone of it to rebuil it as it was in my house.

Democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man.-Ronald Reagan
3 years 35 weeks ago, 5:58 PM

Snake

Snake's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant General
Points:
1514
Join Date:
Nov 2010
Location:
Haysi, Virginia, United States
John Campbell

There is no way on earth to move that house lol. 1. Being in a valley. 2. 90+/- Years old I would say the flooring and the strain of trying to move it would bring it down. 3 the land I am putting it on has no accsess road to it yet so there is no way a truck with the house on it could wedge between the 2 other houses on my property.

I will be sure to check all codes,regulations and anything I have to get before I start construction. And also I will be wiring it myself so I thank god above that I have a copy of the NEC. I am gonna build my house by the book and professinally. And well not to get all squish and soft here but also I want to start and raise my family there. And when I am an old snake I can bask in the comfort of my home with a powerful sense of accomplishment.

So this snake is goin by the book.

Democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man.-Ronald Reagan
3 years 35 weeks ago, 6:04 PM

Ishootdaily

Ishootdaily's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
4375
Join Date:
Feb 2009
Location:
Saint Petersburg, Florida, United States
Snake..

Just want you to know I did not ignore this, but every time I try to give any kind of responce I end up sounding like a Parent so I'm gonna pass with just saying this.

Think about your goals and what they mean to you then consider what taking this on will provide you with for completing those goals.

Your talking about putting allot of time, effort, money into a possibility which if you honestly break down in pro's, con's and possible end game might give you a clearer view of it and answers you already know.

No sir, he fell into that bullet... Never argue with a stupid person. They'll just drag you down to their level and beat you with experience!!
3 years 35 weeks ago, 6:25 PM

Snake

Snake's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant General
Points:
1514
Join Date:
Nov 2010
Location:
Haysi, Virginia, United States
ISD

I would gladly accept you sounding like a parent when giving advice. Anyone who has be around longer than me has the right to.

Its not just tearing down a house and rebuilding to me. Its something I feel as I must do for 2 very good reasons.

1. To push myself to the limits and see if something I see in my mind can in fact become reality. I want this deep in my heart as I want to build something to last beyond my life and maybe the children of my children can grow up in.

2. As you all know I am a history nut and well a 90 year old house has seen a lot. And well the owners second plan was to burn it to the ground if they couldnt find anyone to tear it down. And its just 1/4 mile from where I live so it wont be hard to transport all the material to my build site. So I basically saved a bit of history from ash.

I want to do this and I can say the headaches are worth it to me. This is my second goal. First being college of course. I have set my goal on the house and I will accomplish it.

But like I said this is all IF the negotiations goes as planned.

I respect your input ISD feel free to sound like a parent anytime. I am still young so everyone older than me has the right to sound like a parent towards me. But I dont want to be treated as an inexperienced child. I have a pretty fair knowledge of what I am undertaking. I feel as the headaches and blood,sweat and tears are well worth building my home.

Democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man.-Ronald Reagan
3 years 35 weeks ago, 7:10 PM

Ishootdaily

Ishootdaily's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
4375
Join Date:
Feb 2009
Location:
Saint Petersburg, Florida, United States
Snake.

ok, then...

Unless you've got a good $6000.0 $10,000 to start your project with it really isn't feasible.

Between permits, tools and extended labor/equipment your going to spend anywhere between $3000.00 and $5000.00 conservatively just moving it and at least another $3000.00 to $5000.00 to put it all back together.

Not including the time frame you are speaking of when you take into consideration your talking about doing it yourself.

My brother Mike owns a Home remodeling business and we used to gut homes and change the interior layouts or put on additions and second floors on existing homes. Your talking about spending at least a solid year if not two.

At the same time your going to college, some how it seems that you will end up having to choose between one or the other.

Were as if you focus on school now and graduate, get a job in the field of your major and save, you will be not only better able to full fill doing this at that future time. You will not be ham stringed by lack of funds or resources so it is not a situation where you will have to face cutting corners.

Just my opinion after all and not wanting to dissuade you from anything. But you need to look at the whole picture and your goals for where you want to be in the near and far future.

Your reasons are noble, but noble reasoning is never enough to reach a desired goal. You have to have a means to actually create those reasons into reality...

mmm, guess I'm saying don't dive into the water until you know how deep it is.

No sir, he fell into that bullet... Never argue with a stupid person. They'll just drag you down to their level and beat you with experience!!
3 years 35 weeks ago, 7:19 PM

Snake

Snake's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant General
Points:
1514
Join Date:
Nov 2010
Location:
Haysi, Virginia, United States

However look at it from my point of view. In a way I am between a rock and a hard place. If i chose not to tear it down the it will be burned to the ground. I find that thought disheartening. If it takes 2 or 10 years to build and complete then its worth it to me. The phrase "Rome wasnt built in a day" comes to mind. If I tear down the house and build on mine a little bit at at time then I say it could be finished. How I see it I can spend a little at a time and get needed materials. Then when I need more money then I work and save to get more materials so on and so forth. Im not gonna rush it. I am gonna take my sweet time with it. Salvage from the house what I can and buy what is needed to go with codes and safety.

Democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man.-Ronald Reagan
3 years 35 weeks ago, 7:36 PM

Ishootdaily

Ishootdaily's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
4375
Join Date:
Feb 2009
Location:
Saint Petersburg, Florida, United States
Snake

What are the dimensions of the home? Square foot?

You can not take it apart down to it separate pieces of lumber, pipe, romax, etc. Unless that is your goal... To save as much of it as possible and what you can't save junk out.

You could take it apart in sections as long as you have a means to haul it and a place to store it to keep weather away from it. You have to take into consideration condensation, all of the parts of the home protected for every by the exterior shell will be open to elemental conditions they have never had before.

Do you have a place to store it all protected from the elements?

No sir, he fell into that bullet... Never argue with a stupid person. They'll just drag you down to their level and beat you with experience!!
3 years 35 weeks ago, 8:36 PM

Snake

Snake's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant General
Points:
1514
Join Date:
Nov 2010
Location:
Haysi, Virginia, United States
Yes ISD

My best thinking here is reverse engineer the house. In other words reverse the way the house was built. As for a place to store my lumber in away yes I have a plan to store it. My thinking is to store rhe wood inside the house itself. basically what I am saying strip and gut the house leave one room framed and roofed to store all my lumber and cover it with canvas. This is unless I find a more productive way to store it. Like I tolt John Campbell there is no way to transport it as a whole or in pieces. It look structrally sound but with it being empty for 3 years and in a medium state of disrepair I think wisest choice says to strip it board by board and salvage what I can and scrap the rest.

Democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man.-Ronald Reagan
3 years 35 weeks ago, 7:54 PM

luckybychoice

luckybychoice's picture


Rank:
Secretary of the Treasury
Points:
6793
Join Date:
May 2009
Location:
United States
house

built in the 20s,no trusses,just rafters.A one story house,how many rooms? bathrooms? 20" for frost line there in Virginia for your footings,thats an 8"x 20" concrete footing with 2 course of block,that gets you 4" above grade,very easy to do.The old house is going to come apart like shit though,take lots of pictures,record lots of measurements.You will have to submit a plan to the city and go thru most all the hoops that have already been posted.The big problem is without me even seeing it is most the existing lumber is not properly sized and will not pass code.Back in the old days they set up a mill on site and cut the wood from the existing trees,if thats the case there,foreget it.

i tried being reasonable,i didn't like it, NRA LIFE MEMBER,USMC VETERAN
3 years 35 weeks ago, 8:32 PM

Ishootdaily

Ishootdaily's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
4375
Join Date:
Feb 2009
Location:
Saint Petersburg, Florida, United States
LBC

My father bought a house that was made in the late 1890's up in Maine on the Saint Croix river. It had a Windows Watch on top and was very nice to look at. But I'll be damned when I went into the Cellar I discovered the under ground pool, it was rather shallow at 3 feet deep and there were all these Pump Jacks holding up the freaking floor above you.

LOL

What you've described is called a Clap Board House, Shack, or Cracker Cave down here.

Two wire aluminum foil shielded co-ax for power with porcelain insulators nailed all around for where the wire hit a corner...

Rafters are used down here in Flat pitched roofs with Torch Down felt and stones on top.

Down here in Florida if it is a Gable or Mansard roof it is trussed.

No sir, he fell into that bullet... Never argue with a stupid person. They'll just drag you down to their level and beat you with experience!!
3 years 35 weeks ago, 8:41 PM

luckybychoice

luckybychoice's picture


Rank:
Secretary of the Treasury
Points:
6793
Join Date:
May 2009
Location:
United States
cracker cave

thats great,got me smiling thinking about that,yeah i'd say thats about right,Snake build a cracker cave.Might just get enough wood out of that old house to do it to.

i tried being reasonable,i didn't like it, NRA LIFE MEMBER,USMC VETERAN
3 years 35 weeks ago, 8:55 PM

Snake

Snake's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant General
Points:
1514
Join Date:
Nov 2010
Location:
Haysi, Virginia, United States
LBC

I do not know the square footage yet but there are 12 rooms.

1. Living room at entrance.
2. small room at back of living room with stairs.
3. The stairs lead to bedroom 1
4. side door from living room 1 leads to a small halway with a door at imediate left
5. Imediat left is a bedroom in hall.
6. Bathroom in hallway as well.
8. Dining room with stairs leading up to and add on laundry room.
9. As mention above add on laundry room.
10. is kitchen wit door leading to living room 2
11. is livingroom 2
12. is office room imediate right of living room 2 entrance.

Thats not including the basement.

As for building the house out of exsiting tree's I dont think so. The place is swamped with kudzu vine which has killed most trees there and prevented others from growing.

Its a big ass house. With the stairs leading to upper rooms may consider it a 2 story but from the road it looks 1 story. Now that I think about it I may have bitten off more than I can chew but if the negotiations go through and I get to tear it down then as a man I must honor the deal and do as promised. And come hell or high water I will be there bright and early each day to work on it. with 2 exception days

1 being I have a summer college class once a week.
2 being a sunday which is a church day.

I know its gonna take time so I must stick to it.

Democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man.-Ronald Reagan
3 years 35 weeks ago, 9:17 PM

luckybychoice

luckybychoice's picture


Rank:
Secretary of the Treasury
Points:
6793
Join Date:
May 2009
Location:
United States
yep

basement,story and a half,lathe and plaster interior finish on walls? Houses built in the 20s had studs measuring 2"x 4" actual size not 1&1/2 x 3&1/2 like nowdays,but they were mostly rough cut and air dried.If it has a second story then thats probably ballon framed construction, meaning the floor is tied in differently at the gable ends.

i tried being reasonable,i didn't like it, NRA LIFE MEMBER,USMC VETERAN
3 years 35 weeks ago, 9:28 PM

Snake

Snake's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant General
Points:
1514
Join Date:
Nov 2010
Location:
Haysi, Virginia, United States

The house has had rooms added on in in 90+ years. I belive it to be platform framed. I will know for a fact when I tear in to it. As for interior its more like its been remodeled in the 70's maybe 60's with a panel like stuff. And the ceilig in the living rooms are sheet rock (Dry Wall) Type material. Once I take the dry wall shit down thats trash for sure. I hate dry wall. I will know more as I go along. I will try and get a few pics up before I start tearing it down.

Democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man.-Ronald Reagan
3 years 35 weeks ago, 8:25 AM

clintlebo

clintlebo's picture


Rank:
General
Points:
2311
Join Date:
Aug 2008
Location:
land, of confusion, United States
good luck snake

I am glad I am on the other side of the country. Snake, it is not easy building a house. There is much planning involved. I wish you the best of luck, but your cavalier attitude about the demo and the construction has me worried. Sometimes when you are between the proverbial rock and a hard place, the rock is protecting you...

clint

"Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." (Calvin & Hobbes)
3 years 35 weeks ago, 3:29 PM

Snake

Snake's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant General
Points:
1514
Join Date:
Nov 2010
Location:
Haysi, Virginia, United States
Clint

Your right it is not easy building a house. However I have been building a house at college and find it fun. Your also right about the planning. Like I said above "Rome Was Not Built In A Day" so I will be taking my sweet time planning and also will be checking my work with all the codes. I want to build my house professionally and keep with all codes and regulations.

Why does my attitude towards the demolition worry you my friend? I am keeping positive about it. I am excited to build my own "Dojo" to what I want it to be.

Democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man.-Ronald Reagan

Who's Online

Guns Lot Activity
Users
Currently Active Users: 787 (2 members and 785 guests)
daisycutter, captmax

Guns Lot Statistics
Stats Topics: 8,688, Comments: 161,598, Members: 23,517
Welcome our newest member: Hank6046

Recent Activity