Forums / Gun Discussion / The Minuteman Through the Ages

5 years 41 weeks ago, 3:03 PM

runawaygun762

runawaygun762's picture

Rank:
Vice President
Points:
8929
Join Date:
Nov 2008
Location:
Richland, MO, United States

I am trying to figure out what the most common musket or rifle in American homes was just prior to the War of Independence. My idea is to hang the gun with period-correct ammunition accessories (powder, ball, patch, etc...) over the mantle of my fireplace facing one way, and mount my Bushmaster M4 with Blackhawk chest rig holding 12 loaded mags facing the other. The idea is the guns of the American patriot from the beginning to now, the Minuteman through the ages. I am, of course, a member of the standing army, so I don't technically qualify as a minuteman or member of the local militia, but the desire to protect the nation above all is still here and I will qualify in about seven years when I retire. I'm pretty sure most Americans had one of the Brown Bess guns they or their fathers would have been issued during the French and Indian War, or maybe a captured french gun. Any history buffs in here able to help out? Obviously my intent is to have working replicas, as the real things would force me to sell my sister into prostitution and mom would get mad about that. Any help is appreciated.

"I have always been a soldier. I have known no other life. The calling of arms, I have followed from boyhood. I have never sought another." From The Virtues of War, by Steven Pressfield.
5 years 41 weeks ago, 4:07 PM

Anonymous

Runawayguns

becarful with the dozen mags. dont drop them in the fire. You can look for a kentucky long rifle.

5 years 41 weeks ago, 6:38 PM

Anonymous

runawaygun!

check out dixie gun works.this is their specialty and their prices are reasonable too.here is the link:http://www.dixiegun.com/

5 years 38 weeks ago, 4:38 AM

runawaygun762

runawaygun762's picture

Rank:
Vice President
Points:
8929
Join Date:
Nov 2008
Location:
Richland, MO, United States
Snake

Kentucky long rifle isn't really historically accurate for the minutemen as they would have used cheaper weapons like military surplus. The older brown bess muskets and 1753 french muskets back then were like the Mosin nagant today, whereas the kentucky (pennsylvania) long rifle was like the Sako TRG or M24. nice analogy, huh?

"I have always been a soldier. I have known no other life. The calling of arms, I have followed from boyhood. I have never sought another." From The Virtues of War, by Steven Pressfield.

Who's Online

Guns Lot Activity
Users
Currently Active Users: 786 (1 member and 785 guests)
LLE

Users Active within the last 24 hours
LLE, nobile157, teko52, captmax, DanO, tallguy007, Caber, presslerms
Guns Lot Statistics
Stats Topics: 8,654, Comments: 161,088, Members: 23,517
Welcome our newest member: Hank6046

Recent Activity