Forums / Strategies, Tactics & Training / Mobilizing to Iraq.....How was it for you??

4 years 51 weeks ago, 11:45 PM

PFC Ozier

PFC Ozier's picture

Rank:
Master Sergeant
Points:
20
Join Date:
Oct 2009
Location:
Jackson , Tennessee, United States

I am headed to Iraq in Feb. I was wondering if anybody else has been and if they would give me their thoughts on the "Sand Box"

Cav Scout
4 years 50 weeks ago, 5:51 AM

Pkato

Pkato's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
3348
Join Date:
Aug 2008
Location:
Fort Walton Beach, Florida, United States
Hey PFC Ozier

You didn't get an answer, not sure why because there are folks on the site that were over here...at least a few. Not sure how many now...I am here but as a contractor so I couldn't answer you in terms of military deployment, but OPS TEMP is definitely down where I am located. I am sure somebody will be able to answer questions for you.

Good luck to you though

Patrolman Kato
Firearms stand next in importance to the Constitution itself.
They are the American people's liberty teeth and keystone
under independence. -- George Washington
4 years 47 weeks ago, 2:17 AM

runawaygun762

runawaygun762's picture

Rank:
Vice President
Points:
8929
Join Date:
Nov 2008
Location:
Richland, MO, United States
PFC Ozier

I don't know if you still come in here, but if so, I'll give you some advice. I have been to Iraq three times for a total of 39 months. I'm an MP and all three tours were "Outside the wire" missions, with patrols, raids, and training Iraqi Police. I received an ARCOM with "V" on my first tour and a CAB on my second. I don't tell you this to try to seem cool, just to let you know I'm not some fuckin' FOB rat. Here's my advice to you; think of the worst images you've ever seen in the most disgusting horror movie, and multiply it by about a million. If you go outside the wire on a regular basis for your whole tour, you will end up seeing and smelling things no human should ever have to. I hope to whatever God there is that your tour is as boring as fucking a dead woman. Of course, young Soldiers never want that, you all want to be "in the shit", to see if you're the guy who will curl up in the truck and sart crying (seen it) or if you're the next Audie Murphy with balls of steel (seen it, too). Nothing will ever really prepare you for seeing a fellow Soldier cut in half by an EFP, or throwing water bottles out of your cooler to make room for the severed leg of a lieutenant so you can try to get it back to the FOB in the hopes they can reattach it (he died, and the medevac guys never returned my cooler. Bastards.), but if you expect to have to deal with death and shock and terror, then you will be a step ahead of your peers who deploy believing the news that everything has calmed down. I don't say this stuff to scare you, not at all. I say it as a noncommissioned officer to a junior Soldier hoping you won't get lazy and end up getting yourself, or worse, your team members killed. It's difficult, and I have failed at it myself occassionally, but do your flat best to stay "switched on" from the moment you SP out the gate to the time you RP back home. Sometimes shit happens and people dies no matter what steps you take to prevent it. It's just the nature of the beast. But if your buddy goes home in a box, you had better be able to look his/her parents, husband, wife, and/or kids in the eye and tell them you did everything you could to watch his/her back. Trust me brother, it takes A LOT of alcohol, self loathing, and tears to try to forgive yourself if there's even the slightest doubt about that.

SSG David Marlow

"I have always been a soldier. I have known no other life. The calling of arms, I have followed from boyhood. I have never sought another." From The Virtues of War, by Steven Pressfield.
4 years 47 weeks ago, 3:09 AM

william Lammers

william Lammers's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant Colonel
Points:
102
Join Date:
Jul 2009

True words! The best advice I ever received, was the night I walked out my folks home nearly forty years ago. My Dad, and a few of his life-long friends gave me a going away party, and one of the gentlemen stated "take one day at a time, stay alert, and listen to your instincts". These men fought side by side in World War Two, and then Korea. Truly Warriors, and Brothers...and man did they live!

Slow is smooth, smooth is fast
4 years 47 weeks ago, 3:13 AM

william Lammers

william Lammers's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant Colonel
Points:
102
Join Date:
Jul 2009

PFC Ozier, Thanks for your service, One day at a time, tomorrow is a new day, look forward to it, and so on. Gods Speed

Slow is smooth, smooth is fast

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