Forums / Gun Discussion / should i get a 1911 as my first handgun?

3 years 11 weeks ago, 9:15 AM

moedizzl3

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I have shot a 40cal beretta px4 storm a double action only 9mm(dont remember what kind) and a 45 springfield 1911 i love the look and feel of the 1911 but only shot 5 rounds out of it. i dont know if its the best choice for a first handgun what do you guys recommend i check out?

The cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission. ~John F. Kennedy~
3 years 11 weeks ago, 10:20 AM

moedizzl3

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this was the 9 i shot S&W m&p9
wasnt to crazy about the double action only

The cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission. ~John F. Kennedy~
3 years 11 weeks ago, 10:35 AM

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M&P 9

you can actually put a couple of trigger parts in that and make it just like a 1911 almost.

Larry Camp and Cliff Walsh, two of the guys I shoot with on a regular basis are shooting M&P's in Competition with the Forward Trigger and Lighter Springs and they shoot very sweet.

You should probably look at the CZ 75b line of pistols in 9 mm and Sig 226 9 mm also....

I shoot 9 mm in comp and it is a fun round. Fast follow ups because it is not heavy on the recoil though it is a little snappy, you can hold it in place and dump a mag making one hole, well, you can get to where you can do that...

22 lr 1000's of rounds working on tactical rifle skills, pistol skills and plinking

9mm I generally shoot over 500 rounds a week of this easy, many times three times that.

.40 S&W is what I carry for defense, it is very snappy but again, you get used to what you shoot. This is expensive an round to shoot if your wanting to go throw 200 rounds down range in a day.

45 acp, unless you reload this is a costly round to shoot if your shooting any serious number of rounds a month.

But, it is the *one* when it comes to all around bullets. This is something you can depend upon for self defense, hunting if needs be, target shooting and respect...

No sir, he fell into that bullet... Never argue with a stupid person. They'll just drag you down to their level and beat you with experience!!
3 years 11 weeks ago, 11:53 AM

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Based on this being your first gun, the look and feel might just be the most important factor in your selection.. I read you've shot three, one of which was the little Beretta Storm 40, that pistol has a "snappy" recoil that any full size 1911 wont have.. Easy to see why you liked those 5 rounds from the Springfield. So heck yes go with the 45..

The only draw back on the 45 and a plus to the 9 is cost of shooting.. ISD's comments on the lack of recoil on the 9MM compared to 40/45 pistols, cost of shooting and the tighter groups are on the money.. i recommended (wasn't listened to lol) a 9 to a son-n-law based on same..

Your going to spend less time shooting than ... hmm, ok.. yep we fondle those little suckers.. don't tell the anti gun crowd, they think were weird enough as it is.. Go with your gut and get the 1911..

a man has to hold his word, hold his beliefs, and hold a good sight picture.
3 years 11 weeks ago, 10:24 AM

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1st gun a 1911

Sure why not. If you like it and it seems to fit you for whatever reason. Then you probably should pick one up, there are many good mid range priced 1911's which are build very well.

45 can be a bit hig in price for range shooting if you do not reload, but I do not see where at least 50 rounds a month would not be doable.

For a range gun if your looking to shoot and need to keep the costs down, you could get a 1911 and a 22 conversion for it. This way your shooting with the same frame so all the mechanics are the same and you can build upon your shooting skills and form.

Do not let anyone tell you "you don't need this or anything else other than what I tell you" because, what works for them is not always going to work for someone else. That and most of those with such firm opinions are probably half full of shit and half hot air...

No sir, he fell into that bullet... Never argue with a stupid person. They'll just drag you down to their level and beat you with experience!!
3 years 11 weeks ago, 1:59 PM

daisycutter

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moedizzl3,

Howdy! Sorry I did not have a chance to post to your question while you were on but if you come back to this thread here is my two scents worth.

I love my 1911, it's .45

There are a lot of really great guns other than 1911 on the market, take a good look around before you decide.

If you're fairly new to shooting find a coach to help shoot some really tight groups.

Have fun!!

iyaoyas
3 years 11 weeks ago, 2:53 PM

Reaper308

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1911 for first

What do you plan on doing with it? Is this a range toy, night stand gun, CCW?

There are far easier pistols to field strip and maintain. Glock and M&P may not feel as nice but are really simple to strip down, change parts and really don't need much maintenance. Glocks were meant to shoot dry and will eat pretty much anything. 1911's on the other hand can be temperamental and should to stay wet to run reliably. There's nothing wrong with choosing a 1911 if that’s what you feel comfortable with, just make sure to learn everything about it such as disassembly, maintenance and what ammo it likes. ISD is right about not letting people tell you what you should buy. I would suggest you try a few more pistols out and get a few more rounds down range, then go with the one that fits your hand the best and you feel the most comfortable with.

Personally I love shooting my 1911. It's my favorite pistol to take to the range. The trigger is great and it’s by far the most accurate pistol I own...but If I had to choose only one pistol it would probably be one of my Glocks or maybe a Sig for reliability reasons. Just my preference.

"Proelium Comminus Auctoritate" "Sometimes the light at the end of the tunnel is a muzzle flash."
3 years 11 weeks ago, 3:25 PM

daisycutter

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book that comes with it.
Simple, uncomplicated gun that requires hardly any attention.
They'll shoot just about any ammunition from FMJ, SJHP to SWC.
I've fired some very cheap and very expensive ammo in mine, 1911s will eat almost anything you feed it.
Just follow the simple instructions in the owner's manuel :<)

iyaoyas
3 years 11 weeks ago, 3:37 PM

Reaper308

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eat anything

daisycutter wrote:

They'll shoot just about any ammunition from FMJ, SJHP to SWC.
I've fired some very cheap and very expensive ammo in mine, 1911s will eat almost anything you feed it.

I personally know of two that required the feed ramp to be polished before they would reliably cycle JHP's. just sayin...

"Proelium Comminus Auctoritate" "Sometimes the light at the end of the tunnel is a muzzle flash."
3 years 11 weeks ago, 10:15 AM

Saint J.M. Browning

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eat anything

I'm not going to lie. Reaper is telling the truth on that. Y'all know I love the 1911, but I love honesty more and the truth is, the 1911 as JMB designed doesn't like JHP w/o some alterations to the feed ramp. Most today's 1911A1s don't have a problem, since this is known and they manufacture them with JHP friendly feed ramps. They'll all eat up the hardball, no problem, but some will have issues with the HPs.

"I don't think Hank done it this way" - Waylon
3 years 11 weeks ago, 11:52 AM

daisycutter

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Are you suggesting I am a liar?

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3 years 10 weeks ago, 1:40 PM

Saint J.M. Browning

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Nope, I was inferring that there are times it would be easier on me if I were, but I can't do it. As much as I love the 1911, I would like to say it's flawless, but even JMB wasn't God.

"I don't think Hank done it this way" - Waylon
3 years 10 weeks ago, 6:08 PM

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By John Taffin

The .45 ACP is also bound by several myths. When I started shooting it was a known “fact” the only .45 rounds which could be counted on to feed and function through a 1911 was the standard full metal jacketed hardball. Many gunwriters not only said the .45 ACP 1911 was not dependable but also hung this same albatross around the necks of other semi-automatics. Just as with the .45 Colt this myth has some foundation, however it was busted decades ago. Today's crop of semi-automatics in general, and especially so the .45s, are exceptionally dependable and not only with hardball but also JHPs and cast bullets of many designs.

John August Taffin (born May 2, 1939) is an American author from Boise, Idaho who writes several columns for gun magazines including Guns, Gun Digest, Sixgunner, Shoot! and American Handgunner. A former math teacher from 1964-1995, Taffin is regarded as an authority on single-action revolvers, handloading, handgun hunting, big-bore revolvers, and metallic silhouette shooting.[1] Taffin has authored five books and over 500 published articles. His monthly published gun columns include: Siluetas, Campfire Tales, The Sixgunner, and Taffin Tests.

Taffin is widely regarded as an authority on revolvers, magnum load development, and handguns in general.[2][3][4]

Nine 1911 Myths

By Patrick Sweeney, Guns & Ammo Magazine
September 24, 2010

The feed ramp has to glimmer like mercury to be reliable.
If the feed ramp is in the correct place in the frame and tipped at the right angle, it will feed everything regardless of toolmarks. Does your pistol work? If yes, leave it alone. If not, find the real source of the problem and don’t go polishing everything in sight just because you have power tools and are itching to use them.

With "certain older..." "...With some types of HP..."

"From PMC Ammunition:
With certain older 1911A1 pistols there has been problems with some types of
HP ammunition. There is no way to know if your pistol will have problems
until you try it."
Hardly sounds like an indictment of all the 1911s , does it?

iyaoyas
3 years 10 weeks ago, 8:16 PM

Saint J.M. Browning

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Admittedly, I've never seen it myself. But I've never seen anyone shoot without a recent model either. So, I guess I did buy into it. But the people that told me this aren't people I have a reason to question. But they probably heard it from someone that heard it from someone, etc., you know?

"I don't think Hank done it this way" - Waylon
3 years 10 weeks ago, 8:27 PM

daisycutter

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BS about guns all my life. When a person stops and gives it some thought the absurdity shines, like "got to keep the 1911 wet." That is inviting fail to fire. Excess oil builds up inside slide collecting fired powder residue, soft firing pin hit or no hit at all. Breaking down the slide is fun for me but not very often LOL
It all boils down to the same thing. read the instructions that come with the gun :<))

iyaoyas
3 years 10 weeks ago, 9:56 AM

Reaper308

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daisycutter wrote:
BS about guns all my life. When a person stops and gives it some thought the absurdity shines, like "got to keep the 1911 wet." That is inviting fail to fire. Excess oil builds up inside slide collecting fired powder residue, soft firing pin hit or no hit at all.

I guess I'll repeat the question you asked sjmb. Are you suggesting I'm a liar?

Of course oil collects powder, dirt, sand, grit, sweaty ball hairs and the like. That’s why 1911's require cleaning (more than... say a Glock). That’s just part of the game, but it comes down to simple physics. Metal on metal movement causes friction which requires lubrication to move more effortlessly. It's the same principal is an AR or even the motor in your truck. If you run it dry you will begin to experience failures. Here in the AZ dry heat, a thin coat of oil will disappear very quickly. I've never seen a 1911 that's over lubed. As a matter of fact I usually catch some oil splatter in my face for the first few rounds. Over lubrication has never caused me any failures. Under lubrication has.

"Proelium Comminus Auctoritate" "Sometimes the light at the end of the tunnel is a muzzle flash."
3 years 10 weeks ago, 3:05 PM

daisycutter

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with disinformation being giving to people who are new to the sport. I should have just shut the fuck up and ignored it, right?
I am not suggesting that you are a liar but I'll say that you repeat things you've heard without fact checking. AKA shootin' the shit.
Now, if you'll kindly accept my apology read this.

by Duane Thomas
(Handguns Magazine / November 1994)
Also, while you're lubricating your 1911, don't overdo it. You don't want to oil your gun like you would oil your salad. Excess lube, especially on the breechface, can attack primers and turn your chambered round into a dud.

Instructions: 1911A1

SPRINGFIELD ARMORY® HandbookOnly a very small amount of oil is needed to adequately lubricate moving parts and prevent rust. Stainless Steel pistols require slightly more lubrication than parkerized or blued pistols. Accumulation of oil tends to attract dust and dirt which interferes with the safe and reliable functioning of pistol.Do not apply excess lubricating oil.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/21496491/Springfield-1911A1

9. Use lubricants sparingly on the moving parts of your firearm. Avoidexcessive spraying of any aerosol firearm care product, especially where itmay get on ammunition. All lubricants and aerosol spray lubricants inparticular, can penetrate cartridge primers and cause misfires. Some highlypenetrative lubricants can also migrate inside cartridge cases and causedeterioration of the propellant powder; on firing, the powder may not ignite. If only the primer ignites, there is danger that the bullet may become lodged inthe barrel.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/9138774/Taurus-1911-Manual

iyaoyas
3 years 10 weeks ago, 3:20 PM

Reaper308

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Apology accepted but was not necessary. Obviously, there are two schools of thought. The same theories apply to rifles which I've tested. One is that over lubrication is bad because it collects debris and gets into places where it should not be. The other theory is that there is no such thing as over lubrication (in the proper places). You subscribe to one theory while I subscribe to the other. That’s it.

With my personal experience, not just repeating what I've heard, the "no such thing as over lubrication" theory has corrected problems I've experienced with 1911's. I'm not the only one either. A colt armorer who I know that has 30+ years of 1911 work regularly practices this. I used to believe that you could "over lubricate" certain areas on ARs also because that was what I was taught. After playing devils advocate, I've changed my position with a couple small exceptions. Again, it's just two schools of thought.

We may just have to agree to disagree. The “repeating things without checking them out” comment sounds like you're insinuating that I'm some kind of arm chair commando which I assure you I'm not. I'm just another guy on a forum who has an opinion. People can take it or leave it. Anyway, I believe you took the quote from Duane Thomas out of context (if I'm using the term correctly). The rest of the article in Handguns magazine which you quoted above, talks about the fact that 1911’s need adequate lubrication and that under lubrication is one of the most common causes of failure. He's just suggesting that you avoid oiling the breech face and don't submerge your pistol in KY.

"WHY YOUR 1911 AUTO PISTOL WON’T WORK!!
by Duane Thomas

Handguns Magazine, November 1994

Probably the most commonly heard complaints about the 1911 .45 auto are, “It doesn’t work out of the box.” “It jams all the time.” “You’ve got to put hundreds of dollars into customizing it…..and it still doesn’t work!” There’s a certain amount of truth to these criticisms. Every time I go to a high-level handgun training class, there’s at least one other class attendee shooting a customized 1911. I have yet to see such a shooter complete a full day’s training without his or her gun choking numerous times. As a matter of fact, I’ve seen more jams — and experienced them myself — with the 1911 than with all other types of handguns combined. Why is that? In this article, I’ll try to address what I consider the half dozen or so most common reasons why your 1911 auto won’t work. Before we start, let me make one thing very clear: I love the 1911. I’ve carried Colt Government Models and Combat Commanders for years, and I’m morally certain I’ll carry them again. Some folks have the attitude that the 1911 is perfect — no weak points, no improvements possible. What a nonsensical attitude! Only with a mature appreciation of the design’s strong and weak points and a knowledge of the most common mistakes and pitfalls waiting to trap a 1911 user will you be able to get the most from these guns. Now, why might your 1911 auto not work? I can think of six reasons. These are, in no particular order: (1) incompetent customization, (2) inappropriate ammunition, (3) lack of lubrication, (4) cheap magazines, (5) flaws in the basic design and (6) a propensity toward small-parts breakage.

LACK OF LUBRICATION

All handguns require lubrication to work their best. My experience and the experiences of the top-flight pistolsmiths whose brains I’ve picked on this subject lead me to conclude that this is even more true for the 1911 than with most other firearms. Whenever you start feeling smug about mankind’s technological progress, remind yourself of this: We have not yet progressed to the point where our handguns will function unless we smear them with dinosaur grease.

How long has it been since you last lubricated your 1911? If it has been more than about three days, the piece is probably bone-dry. Oil evaporates; if you carry the gun muzzle down in a holster, gravity pulls the oil down the slide rails, around the bushing and out of the gun. Some folks tout the various teflon-based lubricants as the cure for this. In my experience, they don’t last one bit longer than the natural products.

Every few days, take a minute or so to lube your 1911. Unload the gun; lock the slide to rear. Put a small drop of oil on each slide rail and let it run into the gun. If you have a Colt with the firing pin lock, you might want to take this opportunity to put a small drop of oil on the firing pin lock plunger in the slide. Lightly rub a thin coat of oil on the exposed barrel where it rides the bushing when the gun is cycling. Let the slide go forward and put one small drop of oil on the front of the barrel hood where it meets the front of the ejection port. Cycle the gun’s action a few times, and you’re in business. Frankly, I like to do a more leisurely job of lubing my 1911s in which I actually field strip the piece, but the quick-’n'-easy method I’ve just described will be sufficient.

Also, while you’re lubricating your 1911, don’t overdo it. You don’t want to oil your gun like you would oil your salad. Excess lube, especially on the breechface, can attack primers and turn your chambered round into a dud"

http://www.sightm1911.com/Care/1911_Maintain.htm

"Proelium Comminus Auctoritate" "Sometimes the light at the end of the tunnel is a muzzle flash."
3 years 10 weeks ago, 7:16 PM

daisycutter

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Reaper308,

You said : "I believe you took the quote from Duane Thomas out of context (if I'm using the term correctly)."
No, you need to re-read the article you posted but did not acknowlege the words"Small", "Lightly" and "don’t overdo it" in the article regarding the amount of lube used. In no way can that be construed to mean "Wet".

I posted owner's manuals lube instructions from Taurus and Springfield both of which admonished against over oiling, you did not comment.
Are the manufacturers too stupid to warrant listening to? Do you need to teach them how to care for the guns they build?

Once again, people first coming into the shooting sports deserve correct information, not bullshit.
If you think a small amount or lightly oiling just ain't enough thats cool, soak your thing in oil, hey it's yours, do what ever you wish but please do the right thing by the novices and ask them to follow the owner's manual, okay?.

iyaoyas
3 years 10 weeks ago, 8:47 PM

Reaper308

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roger that

I'm not disagreeing that someone should read the manufacturer's manual. You are correct with that statement. I also agree that "people new to shooting sports deserve correct information, not bullshit." That’s why I disagreed with the statement you made regarding 1911's - "Simple, uncomplicated gun that requires hardly any attention". In my experience (again not repeating what someone else has said) 1911's are more complicated and require more attention than most modern pistols. If a novice feels comfortable with a 1911 that’s fine with me. He/she should go with whatever suits their needs especially if that’s what they have confidence shooting. I was just getting at the fact there may be easier, less complicated choices which require no attention for a first pistol.

Of course I can't tell manufacturers how their pistols should run. All I can tell you is that from my own personal experience, if I'm going out to the desert to put a couple hundred rounds through my springer, it performs much better when I thoroughly coat all of the friction surfaces than if I just use a "small amount". I don't soak anything, just apply generously. Unfortunately opinions are like assholes and it's up to the person seeking the information to determine which one is full of shit. Streets!

"Proelium Comminus Auctoritate" "Sometimes the light at the end of the tunnel is a muzzle flash."
3 years 11 weeks ago, 4:14 PM

moedizzl3

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thanks for the insight i'll send more rounds down range but for the time being the 1911 is in the lead... i hit the range about once or twice a week i know if i get a 45 it might have to be every other week that or get another job...lol
im not a big fan of double action only hand guns got alot of friends that are pushing glocks on me not trying to take anything away from glocks there an amazing gun they proved that less is really more but the double action only just didnt feel good for me..
and im so sick of those anti gun haters of america i work with so many freaking haters of freedom smh it saddens me...
Thanks again

The cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission. ~John F. Kennedy~
3 years 11 weeks ago, 6:01 PM

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best'est buddy..

No sir, he fell into that bullet... Never argue with a stupid person. They'll just drag you down to their level and beat you with experience!!
3 years 11 weeks ago, 1:01 AM

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1911's

moedizzl3 wrote:
thanks for the insight i'll send more rounds down range but for the time being the 1911 is in the lead... i hit the range about once or twice a week i know if i get a 45 it might have to be every other week that or get another job...lol
im not a big fan of double action only hand guns got alot of friends that are pushing glocks on me not trying to take anything away from glocks there an amazing gun they proved that less is really more but the double action only just didnt feel good for me..
and im so sick of those anti gun haters of america i work with so many freaking haters of freedom smh it saddens me...
Thanks again

Moe, I personally own/carry two 1911's, a full size Sistema Colt and an ultra compact Springfield, and love them both. I think if you're looking for something for self defense you can't go wrong with the 1911: the caliber is strong, the ammo is readily available, there's safety feature on top of safety feature, and they're reliable. There's a reason the military kept the 1911 for 75 years, they work. If cost is an issue I've found the 1911's from Rock Island Armory to be good for the price. Good luck choosing.

3 years 11 weeks ago, 4:18 PM

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and i all i want the gun for is range and home defence ccw is almost impossible to get in nj

The cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission. ~John F. Kennedy~
3 years 11 weeks ago, 7:16 PM

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Now the fun part, picking out one to buy :<)
I've owned several govmnt issue but the one I have now is a Thompson Auto Ordnance.

I did have the throat work done for more reliable feeding of home rolled ammo. (aka: feed ramp) :<)
Not all of them need it, check it out b4 paying someone with a grinder (shudder) to "fix" your gun.

Loading your own ammo is a way to make it even more fun!
Good luck!

iyaoyas
3 years 11 weeks ago, 11:16 AM

luckybychoice

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1911 for first gun

absolutely,then invest in some qualified training with it.There is a learning curve to shooting a 1911,first you have to have fundamental gun handling skills,grip,proper stance,etc.Time spent with a qualified instructor will help a lot.Some people new to shooting go out and buy a gun and take it to the range and experience stove pipes,failure to feed issues,heavy recoil,flinching,etc,etc,and blame the gun.Don't fall into that trap,get some good basics and shoot the hell out of that 1911,after a couple thousand rounds,you and the gun will be happy,(not saying it takes thousands of rounds to brek in a gun,just practice....proper practice that is)

I have a buddy that has never owned a gun getting a .45 and i am going to teach him,i am qualified to teach him,poor bastard ain't never gonna be the same.

i tried being reasonable,i didn't like it, NRA LIFE MEMBER,USMC VETERAN
3 years 11 weeks ago, 10:20 AM

Saint J.M. Browning

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LBC

Maybe the next time I make my way up there and let TBH know I'm planning on some 'me' time, I'll trade you some beers for some shooting lessons.
I'm not bad, but I ain't that great either. I'm sure your expertise would do wonders on my placement.

"I don't think Hank done it this way" - Waylon
3 years 10 weeks ago, 4:30 PM

luckybychoice

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your on dude

Don't threaten me with a good time mister.

i tried being reasonable,i didn't like it, NRA LIFE MEMBER,USMC VETERAN
3 years 10 weeks ago, 4:41 PM

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It'd be better

If you just ride on down here and school me and SJMB. I got the range and the ammo. SJMB can cover the refreshments. : )

The truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth!
3 years 10 weeks ago, 8:33 PM

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ok but in edit

I don't drink alcohol,a coke will be just fine,btw,not drinking booze does not mean i won't be telling dirty jokes to the kids,flirting with the women,picking fights with the neighbors and somebodys probably gonna end up in jail.iiiii

i tried being reasonable,i didn't like it, NRA LIFE MEMBER,USMC VETERAN
3 years 10 weeks ago, 8:37 PM

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Location:
Arkansas

`

iyaoyas
3 years 11 weeks ago, 12:23 PM

daisycutter

daisycutter's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
5442
Join Date:
Jul 2009
Location:
Arkansas

finesse but thousands of people's 1st experience with a pistol was the 1911 in the military and many ended up shooting competition with them.
Proper maintenance: Read the owner's manuel, don't listen to urban myths. 1911's are rock solid reliable weapons if treated right. I've been a 1911 owner since I was 14 or 15 years old. I have several other guns but none I would trust more.

LBC, you having any good shootin' weather up there? I've been wanting to shoot for almost 2 weeks but it's been too windy. Dang straw bales I use for target frames fell over, deer like to chew on them and prolly knocked them down to get to some better eatin'

iyaoyas
3 years 11 weeks ago, 1:22 PM

luckybychoice

luckybychoice's picture


Rank:
Secretary of the Treasury
Points:
6795
Join Date:
May 2009
Location:
United States
it's been cool up here

not terrible,next week 55 degrees.

i tried being reasonable,i didn't like it, NRA LIFE MEMBER,USMC VETERAN
3 years 11 weeks ago, 12:51 PM

LLE

LLE's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
3034
Join Date:
Jul 2008
Location:
United States

I absolutely love the 1911. It was the first handgun I ever shot---that was at National Guard summer camp--Camp Perry Ohio, along with the M1 Garrand and the M1A1 Carbine. Then they decided that our issue arm would be the carbine. That was fine, but I preferred the 1911, because with my job, any rifle just got in the way, so to speak. Before Korean departure, you know who bought a 1911.

Now, I have a "baby" 1911--a Sig ultra compact. I swear it shoots as well or better than any full size model, and it's very easy to carry.

Too old to fight, Too old to run, guess that's why I carry a gun! "would someone show this asshole the way out of town".[Rabbi Avram Belinski-aka "The Frisco Kid"]
3 years 10 weeks ago, 8:02 PM

Ishootdaily

Ishootdaily's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
4375
Join Date:
Feb 2009
Location:
Saint Petersburg, Florida, United States
TG compac 1911

This will shot with or out right out shoot any 1911 you put next to it. You can find them cheaper if you look around, the price keep going up though as they get better known...

http://www.tombstonetactical.com/catalog/american-classic/1911-amigo-pis...

No sir, he fell into that bullet... Never argue with a stupid person. They'll just drag you down to their level and beat you with experience!!
3 years 10 weeks ago, 9:01 PM

luckybychoice

luckybychoice's picture


Rank:
Secretary of the Treasury
Points:
6795
Join Date:
May 2009
Location:
United States
an fyi

There is a nice lubricant used by locksmiths that repels dirt,not graphite orwd40,and being the helpful guy i am i can't remember the name.i might have to ask the audience for help on this one.

i tried being reasonable,i didn't like it, NRA LIFE MEMBER,USMC VETERAN
3 years 10 weeks ago, 9:42 PM

daisycutter

daisycutter's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
5442
Join Date:
Jul 2009
Location:
Arkansas

weird, waxy stuff but sets up dry

iyaoyas
3 years 10 weeks ago, 9:44 PM

greg az

greg az's picture

Rank:
Secretary of Homeland Security
Points:
5873
Join Date:
Oct 2009
Location:
New York, NY, Trinidad and Tobago

Got this from my brother.. im looking at;

TM 9-1005-211-34 Department of the Army Technical manual /plus supplemental material from TM 9-1005-211-12 direct and general support maintenance manual PISTOL, CALIBER .45, AUTOMATIC, M1911A! /headquarters department of the Army, 22 June 1964

wheewf.. I can honestly say this puppy is a blast to read, and great pictures..Not as "dry" as you would think either, it's 68 pages of 1911 porn.. Starts with 5 pages of background, expanded bio of JMB..I wasn't aware of his TN roots, or his time in Quincy IL and sure not aware that before the model 1900/1902 which were all familiar with old John first started with a "gas" (yep, not recoil) pistol model of 1895. Saint theres supposed to be one of these in union station museum in Ogden, im guessing that this was pre the current museam, but have you seen this piece?

OK.. on page 30 "lubrication" it says .. wait for it.. lubricate all moving parts with some long mil spec number of oil.. only this goofy group could spend hours debating how wet to run a 1911.. I love it.. I have always kept my pieces more on the "wet" side.. Daisys right about dust etc, but it just works for me.. Bottom line, the manual doesn't specify how much oil to use..

a man has to hold his word, hold his beliefs, and hold a good sight picture.
3 years 10 weeks ago, 10:19 PM

daisycutter

daisycutter's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
5442
Join Date:
Jul 2009
Location:
Arkansas

the "Gun Hospital" today but always reliable GS website lost it for me, Shiite!!
Trigger works great, I only lost 1 empty in the grass this afternoon, 49 in the box :<)
When I worked at the small arms range and armory I read the books but don't recall any amount of oil called out but you know Black Shoes, any puddle of oil in the pistol locker and there'd be hell to pay. When we assembled the weapons we wetted a cloth with oil and wiped the surfaces. It only takes an incredibly thin film of oil to do it's job.
As for the lubricant debate, I'm finished, if facts cannot be accepted then screw it, let ignorance prevail. Ya think?
My test this morning went very fast, good thing I studied for it LOL !! I'll get my grade in a few days from the hottie

iyaoyas
3 years 10 weeks ago, 10:02 PM

HampsterW

HampsterW's picture

Rank:
Secretary of State
Points:
7723
Join Date:
Jan 2010
Location:
Cottonwood Heights, Utah, United States
Sta-Lube red

EP grease, that's what I use on my AR bolt carrier's and my semi auto pistol slides, hasn't failed me yet, used to use Lucas gun oil but it disappears quick, soaks into the holster maybe, evaporates, who knows?

Change you can truly believe in comes from the barrel of a gun---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ron Paul 2012----Vote the bastards out!---------------------------------
3 years 10 weeks ago, 10:06 PM

daisycutter

daisycutter's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
5442
Join Date:
Jul 2009
Location:
Arkansas

a fingertip of it. Little bit went a long way :<)

iyaoyas
3 years 10 weeks ago, 9:57 AM

MattyTheJet

MattyTheJet's picture

Rank:
Lieutenant General
Points:
1027
Join Date:
Mar 2012
Location:
Sebring, Florida, United States
Tri-Flow

Tri-flow is good, but you have to use it sparingly.

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