Forums / Strategies, Tactics & Training / Treating wounds, pt 6 Evaluating a casualty (step 5-8)

4 years 40 weeks ago, 12:40 PM

runawaygun762

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5- Checking for shock. Shock means there is inadequate blood going to the tissues and organs. There a quite a few different symptoms to look for These include:

Sweaty but cool skin (clammy skin).
Paleness of skin. (In dark-skinned people, look for a grayish color of the skin.)
Restlessness or nervousness. (This is one I've seen nearly every time)
Thirst.
Confusion (does not seem aware of surroundings).
Faster than normal breathing rate. (Rapid, shallow breathing, especially)
Blotchy or bluish skin, especially around the mouth.
Nausea or vomiting.

6- Check for fractures. Spinal fractures are the most important to look for and there are a few things to look for. If the casualty is conscious, ask them if they are able to move. Try to determine any decreased sensation to extremities (paralyisis or numbness). Look for unusual body position, or odd angles of extremities. Open fractures are usually a bit easier to determine, since the bone is sticking through the skin (Did anyone else just cringe?) Things to look for when looking for closed fractues include:
Swelling.
Discoloration.
Deformity.
One other thing to check is what's called capillary refill. To see how this works, press down on your fingernail for a second. When you let go, you'll notice the area under your fingernail is white and turns red again quickly. This is the blood being squeezed out of the capillaries there and filling back up when you let go. A broken bone will sometimes pinch a blood vessel, so when you do this to a casualty, it will take longer to refill.

7- Check for burns. These are easier to check for. There are a few levels and types of burns, but we'll only go over the three basic ones, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degree burns.

1st degree- Red, tender area. Everyone has had these.
2nd degree- Raised blisters, very painful, will almost always have first degree around the edges.
3rd degree- Blackened, charred skin, sometimes grayish in color if the casualty is dark skinned. If the casualty is consciaous, they may not have any pain there. This is because the nerves are burned and dead.

8- Check for head injuries. There are quite a few symptoms to look for here also:

Unequal pupils.
Fluid from the ear(s), nose, mouth, or injury site. (Is fairly clear and has almost a sweet smell to it)
Slurred speech.
Confusion.
Sleepiness. (Do not let them go to sleep)
Loss of memory or consciousness.
Staggering in walking.
Headache.
Dizziness.
Nausea or vomiting.
Paralysis.
Convulsions or twitches.
Bruising around the eyes and behind the ears.

Hah hah, and you people thought you were just drunk at the bars, huh?

"I have always been a soldier. I have known no other life. The calling of arms, I have followed from boyhood. I have never sought another." From The Virtues of War, by Steven Pressfield.
4 years 40 weeks ago, 1:03 PM

greg az

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Honestly excellent post. We had so much trauma in Corrections that triage was a way of life, and I've sat thru enough red cross CPR classes (we had to requal every yr) then as a supervisor i HAD to be an instructor, as i liked the field i did T4T, which is dept. speak for train the trainer, So i was sorta yawning at the first one..

You have now gone WAY past the best triage training i had combined in just short of 20 years, really great stuff for all of us.. Thanks and keep it coming!!

a man has to hold his word, hold his beliefs, and hold a good sight picture.
4 years 40 weeks ago, 1:18 PM

runawaygun762

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Aww, thanks.

My plan is to recruit my wife to assist me with a couple videos on this stuff to help out other members. I'm also going to take some pics of a few of the different items in my aid bag and do a post or twelve on improvised items. Trying to give pointers or demonstrate techniques with guns is a bit harder than this medical stuff, but the medical aspect is also important. When the bullets are done, there's bound to be somebody bleeding. Besides, first aid training can give wives a sense of empowerment and evaluating a casualty can be fun to practice on the wifey. "Uh oh, I feel a wet spot down here. Is that blood? No? Well, let's just keep playing doctor, shall we?" Heh heh heh.

"I have always been a soldier. I have known no other life. The calling of arms, I have followed from boyhood. I have never sought another." From The Virtues of War, by Steven Pressfield.
4 years 40 weeks ago, 8:56 PM

luckybychoice

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good info

nice work,now detail a med bag contents,they are now selling trousers with tourniquits sewn into the pants at upper/lower leg locations,tacticool,i know but if your on a range and you shoot yourself reholstering you are (1) in a world of hurt (2) trauma close to an artery (3) most people out plinking don't carry much if anything for a medkit,i know i didn't for a long time,i have since put together a kit as part of my shooting bag.and we're gonna need photos of....

i tried being reasonable,i didn't like it, NRA LIFE MEMBER,USMC VETERAN
4 years 40 weeks ago, 10:14 PM

runawaygun762

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Vice President
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Richland, MO, United States

That'll probably be the next post I do, then I'll get into treating various injuries using the dedicated supplies like I have as well as improvised items in case you can't get hold of an Asherman chest seal dressing or CAT tourniquet.

"I have always been a soldier. I have known no other life. The calling of arms, I have followed from boyhood. I have never sought another." From The Virtues of War, by Steven Pressfield.

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