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 Twin Tokarev TT 30'sTokarev TT 30

In 1930, the Revolutionary Military council approved a resolution to test new small arms to replace its aging Nagant M1895 revolvers[1]. During these test, on January 7, 1931, the potential of a pistol designed by Fedor Tokarev was noted. A few weeks later, 1000 TT-30's were ordered for troop trials, and the pistol was adopted for service in the Red Army[2]. But even as the TT-30 was being put into production, design changes were made to simplify manufacturing. Minor changes to the barrel, disconnector[3], trigger and frame were implemented, the most notable ones being the omission of the removable backstrap and changes to the full-circumference locking lugs. This redesigned pistol was the TT-33[2]. The TT-33 was widely used by Soviet troops during World War II, but did not completely replace the Nagant until that war.

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FN Special Police Rifle A4FN Special Police Rifle A4

FN SPR - Special Police Rifles. The "Classic" (Pre-'64) Winchester® design has a massive claw extractor that improves reliability by engaging approximately 1/4 of the cartridge rim. The SPR's safety has a middle position which blocks the firing pin, yet still allows you to work the action for loading and unloading. SPR match-grade barrels are hammer forged from a superior alloy and the bores are chrome-plated for superior accuracy and long life. These barrels meet or exceed Mil-Spec in all criteria. All models of the SPR use one of three types of McMillan® tactical rifle stocks. These are the highest quality magnum-filled fiberglass stocks on the market today and are guaranteed for life. #21804 - FNA3 - .308 DBM A4 - 24" Barrel

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Lee-EnfieldLee-Enfield

The Lee-Enfield bolt-action, magazine-fed, repeating rifle was the main firearm used by the military forces of the British Empire/Commonwealth during the first half of the 20th century. It was the British Army's standard rifle from its official adoption in 1895 until 1957. The Lee-Enfield used the .303 British cartridge and in Australia, the rifle was so well-known, that it became synonymous with the term "303". It was also used by the military forces of Canada, India, New Zealand, Pakistan and South Africa, among others. A redesign of the Lee-Metford, which had been adopted by the British Army in 1888, the Lee-Enfield remained in widespread British service until well into the early 1960s and the 7.62 mm L42 sniper variant remained in service until the 1990s. As a standard-issue infantry rifle, it is still found in service in the armed forces of some Commonwealth nations. The Lee-Enfield featured a ten-round box magazine which was loaded manually from the top, either one round at a time, or by means of five-round chargers. The Lee-Enfield superseded the earlier Martini-Henry, Martini-Enfield, and Lee-Metford rifles, and although officially replaced in the UK with the L1A1 SLR in 1957, it continues to see official service in a number of British Commonwealth nations to the present day—notably with the Indian Police—and is the longest-serving military bolt-action rifle still in official service. Total production of all Lee-Enfields is estimated at over 17 million rifles, making it one of the most numerous military bolt-action rifles ever produced—second only to the Russian Mosin-Nagant M91/30, which was itself a contemporary design.

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