.36 Colt 1862 Revolver

.36 Colt 1862 Revolver

The Model 1862 Colt was a smaller, lighter, five shot, revolver then the earlier six shot Model 1851. Both are "36" caliber using .375" bullets. Around 47,000 of the 1862 were made by Colt between 1862 and 1873, which is a little fewer then one-fifth as many as the Model 1851.

The Police Model has the smooth flowing contour barrel first seen in the .44 caliber 1860 Colt Army revolver, and a deeply fluted cylinder to reduce weight. It also has the creeping style loading lever of the Model 1860. Barrels were available in lengths of 3-1/2" (which were rare), 4-1/2", 5-1/2" (shown), and 6-1/2". Total production of the Police Model is around 28,000.

The Navy model cylinder is unfluted with a Navy battle scene roll engraved on it. The octagonal barrel is a slightly smaller version of the Model 1851 Navy. Barrels were available in lengths of 4-1/2", 5-1/2" (shown), and 6-1/2". Total production of the Pocket Navy Model is around 19,000.

The 1862 is significantly smaller than its look alike predecessor, the 1860 Colt Army in 44 caliber.

To many collectors, the Colt models 1860 and 1862 are the epitome in development of the cap and ball revolvers.

Both were loaded with loose blackpowder, a bare bullet, fired with percussion caps, and referred to as "cap and ball," or with paper cartridges. Loading a cap and ball revolver is from the front of the cylinder.

Manufacturing quality control suffers during any war, including Colt in the Civil War. If the barrel moved too far forward, the cylinder would move forward to where the hammer couldn't reach the percussion caps. Then the gun wouldn't fire (shoot). Field expediency would exchange barrels and cylinders among revolvers for the most serviceable fit. Navy cylinders can be found on pistols with Police barrels, and vice versa. The frames for both guns are the same with a single series of serial numbers for both models.
For more information, consult "Flayderman's Guide To Antique American Firearms" by Norm Flayderman, or "Colt Conversions" by R. Bruce McDowell.
Technical Information
Length 11 Inches
Weight 1 ½ pounds
Caliber 36 (.375")
Bullet Weight 76 grains
Power Charge 22 grains
Muzzle Velocity 750 feet per seconds
Muzzle Energy 100 foot pounds

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15 Comments

4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:11 AM

greg az

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Vaq has a Richards (i butchered that) conversion on the 1851 (cimarron i think) in 38 spl.. I read a test of one of them, and it was great except a bit tight.. Vaq says his is the same..

I didn't know bout you guys but i sure like everything about the naval version.. from the hex bbl to the unfluted cyl.. old uncle Bill he carried a brace of 1851, and not the 1862 right,, dubya or one of you SASS.. Weight seems real light at 24 oz.. M&P is about 33 the 1911 is 39 by comparison.. Still wonder how long you can keep them loaded for...

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4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:28 AM

CharlesW

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problem with the Navy Colt was a weak brass frame
and slack in the cylinder also allowed the caps to fall off.
Sometimes the caps got caught and wouldn't allow the
cylinder to rotate and some times they fired causing
serious burns to the shooter. The cylinders are easy
to change and cavalrymen sometimes carried several
preloaded extras.

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4 years 19 weeks ago, 4:44 AM

Vaquero

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Dubya

The Union version Navy had a steel frame, the Confederate version was brass.
Just a matter of economics in that war.

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4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:25 AM

ACE

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Greg az

The gunsmith in me is asking this.... My husband didnt know either, so here goes...... What is the "hinge" part on the Navy version, thats diff from the police version???? Please explain this!!

“When firearms go, all goes. We need them every hour.”- George Washington
4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:31 AM

CharlesW

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is the lever under the barrel that is used to seat

the bullet in the cylinder

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4 years 19 weeks ago, 4:46 AM

Vaquero

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ACE

Both models have the hinge, it is just concealed by the smoother lines of the police model.
Hope this helps.
Dang girl, you're like a duck on a june bug.

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4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:31 AM

Anonymous

ACE

the "hinge" on the 1851 refers to the hinge of the built in ramrod.this being a black powder cap and ball gun.the hinge on a "police" refers to a later tip up revolver where they had a latch and the top part of the frame(above the cylinder)broke open and the gun tilted up,ejected the shells and was ready for reloading.totally different era's in gun developement

4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:31 AM

Anonymous

oh never mind!

my bad!

4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:35 AM

ACE

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Greasy

PLEASE dont take this the wrong way Greasy, but then WTF is the diff. They were both made in 1862????? No diff Era???

“When firearms go, all goes. We need them every hour.”- George Washington
4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:37 AM

ACE

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Greasy

The only diff on these guns is the CYLINDER and the HINGE!!!!????????????????????

“When firearms go, all goes. We need them every hour.”- George Washington
4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:37 AM

Anonymous

ACE

i was thinking 2 diff eras.thses 2 guns in the pics are diff yet the same.the words posted tell the diifs.I just had a brain fart is all.

4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:39 AM

ACE

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Greasy

Thats cool, But it still doesnt explain the diff w the "hinge" shit... Thats it....

“When firearms go, all goes. We need them every hour.”- George Washington
4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:41 AM

ACE

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Greasy

I was ONLY looking @ the "bubble" when I pointed @ the pic.... SORRY!!!!!! They were made B 4 1862, but anyway......... SORRY!!!! But what is the "hinge" for???????????

“When firearms go, all goes. We need them every hour.”- George Washington
4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:41 AM

Anonymous

ACE

basically,the diff is the cylinder,and barrel outer shape.caliber is the same.36 caliber.the police is a bit lighter that is all.

4 years 19 weeks ago, 12:51 AM

ACE

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I guess its just for looks????The Hinge 1/3 of the way down the barrel on the Navy version is for what??? Looks???? Im sorry Greasy, Its gotta B there 4 a reason???????

“When firearms go, all goes. We need them every hour.”- George Washington
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