Flying Heritage Collection adds two WWII Flak 37 guns

Flying Heritage Collection adds two WWII Flak 37 guns

Flying Heritage Collection adds two WWII Flak 37 guns

Courtesy Flying Heritage Collection
The Flying Heritage Collection, at Everett's Paine Field, has added two World War II Flak 37 artillery weapons, the museum announced Monday.

The 88 mm German anti-aircraft gun "was the most famous artillery weapon of World War II," the museum said in a news release.

"The addition of the Flak 37s allows us to illustrate an important influence on the development of aircraft during World War II," Adrian Hunt, the collection's executive director, said in the release. "Our hope for the museum is to continue to capture the extraordinary innovation in technology during WWII and provide a forum for the public to learn about and appreciate this rich history."

German designers developed gun in the late 1920s, working in Switzerland to avoid treaty restrictions, the museum said. It attributed the "flak" name to the German word "Flugabwehrkanone," meaning aircraft defense cannon. The weapon could fire about 15 high-explosive shells per minute to altitudes of more than 30,000 feet.

The Flying Heritage Collection's new Flak 37s were built in Pilsen, Czechoslovakia, for the German military, discovered in Spain and brought back to Germany by a collector after World War II and restored last year by experts in Germany and the United States.

The museum plans to put one gun on permanent display and use the other to fire blanks at special public events. It has scheduled the first public display and firing Sept. 19 at Luftwaffe Day, which is also set to feature a German Messerschmitt Bf 109 and Fieseler Fi 156 Storch in flight.

The free event is scheduled to start at noon at Paine Field, 3407 109th St. S.W., Everett.

More From samD

4 Comments

4 years 46 weeks ago, 6:34 PM

LLE

LLE's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
2858
Join Date:
Jul 2008
Location:
United States

The 88 could not outshoot the US 90mm, either altitude-wise or accuracy-wise. Our 90's were used in as many applications as the 88's, and busted the hell out of tanks and fortifications, as well as knocking the crap out of the Luftwaffe. In addition, it could be directed by a then state of the art analog computer/tracking radar combination, and could utilize a radio-proximity warhead fuze that made it doubly effective against aircraft.

The only important difference between the 88 and the 90 was thaat hardly anyone heard of the 90.

Too old to fight, Too old to run, guess that's why I carry a gun! "would someone show this asshole the way out of town".[Rabbi Avram Belinski-aka "The Frisco Kid"]
4 years 46 weeks ago, 7:39 PM

samD

samD's picture

Rank:
President
Points:
15597
Join Date:
Aug 2008
Location:
Green Valley, Free State of Arizona, United States

Drive to Seattle and tell them...LOL

4 years 46 weeks ago, 9:59 PM

LLE

LLE's picture

Rank:
General
Points:
2858
Join Date:
Jul 2008
Location:
United States

the museum gurus seem to be suffering from myopia, however. they need to acquire a 90mm, and put them side by side. That would be fun to look at. Incidentally, our gun crews could put up 21 rounds/minute on the M1[manually loaded model], and close to 30 on the M1A1 model[semiautomatic loading].
Items of history: Our 90 system saved the Anzio beach head by destroying more than 95% of the Luftwaffe attackers; and the 90's killed an extremely high percentage of V-1 buzz bombs over England, saving many Spitfire and Hurricane Pilots for other combat.

Too old to fight, Too old to run, guess that's why I carry a gun! "would someone show this asshole the way out of town".[Rabbi Avram Belinski-aka "The Frisco Kid"]
4 years 26 weeks ago, 4:40 PM

runawaygun762

runawaygun762's picture

Rank:
Vice President
Points:
8929
Join Date:
Nov 2008
Location:
Richland, MO, United States

hardly anyone heard of the 90 and all sorts of people have heard of the 88, that would make the 88 more famous, right? The quote was famous, not effective. Also, I think because of the amount of time the Allies spent on the offensive once they gained a foothold in Europe, the 88 was more active than it's allied counterparts. Just my thought, I wasn't there (I don't think).

"I have always been a soldier. I have known no other life. The calling of arms, I have followed from boyhood. I have never sought another." From The Virtues of War, by Steven Pressfield.
samD's picture
Posted by: samD
4 years 46 weeks ago
Views:
3,019
Comments:
4

Rating Overview

This text will be replaced

Recent Activity