Greasypaws Home Alarm System.

Greasypaws Home Alarm System.

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5 years 17 weeks ago, 9:46 AM

Beagle1hd

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Aug 2009
Redneck house alarm

Foolproof and always works.

Things are not always as they appear, so Keep your head down and your powder dry!
5 years 17 weeks ago, 12:48 PM

Anonymous

very true

love dog's

5 years 17 weeks ago, 12:59 PM

Reaper308

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Secretary of Defense
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Jun 2008
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you love dog's _______?

Possessive apostrophe
See also: Saxon genitive
An apostrophe is used in English to indicate possession. The practice ultimately derives from the Old English genitive case: the "of" case, itself used as a possessive in many languages. The genitive form of many nouns ended with the inflection -es, which evolved into a simple -s for the possessive ending. An apostrophe was later added to mark the omitted e.

Joint and separate possession
A distinction is made between joint possession (Jason and Sue's emails: the emails of both Jason and Sue), and separate possession (Jason's and Sue's emails: the emails of Jason, and the emails of Sue). Style guides differ only in how much detail they provide concerning these. Their consensus: in joint possession only the last possessor has possessive inflection; in separate possession all the possessors have possessive inflection. But if any of the possessors is indicated by a pronoun, then for both joint and separate possession all of the possessors have possessive inflection (His and her emails; His, her, and Anthea's emails; Jason's and her emails; His and Sue's emails; His and Sue's wedding; His and Sue's weddings).

General principles for the possessive apostrophe
Basic rule (singular nouns)
For most singular nouns the ending 's is added; e.g., the cat's whiskers.

If a singular noun ends with an /s/ or a /z/ sound (spelled with -s, -se, -z, -ce, for example), practice varies as to whether to add 's or the apostrophe alone. A widely accepted practice is to follow whichever spoken form is judged better: the boss's shoes, Mrs Jones' hat (or Mrs Jones's hat, if that spoken form is preferred). In many cases, both spoken and written forms differ between writers. (See details below.)
Basic rule (plural nouns)
When the noun is a normal plural, with an added s, no extra s is added in the possessive; so pens' caps (where there is more than one pen) is correct rather than pens's caps.

If the plural is not one that is formed by adding s, an s is added for the possessive, after the apostrophe: children's hats, women's hairdresser, some people's eyes (but compare some peoples' recent emergence into nationhood, where peoples is meant as the plural of the singular people). These principles are universally accepted.
A few English nouns have plurals that are not spelled with a final s but end in an /s/ or a /z/ sound: mice (plural of mouse, and for compounds like dormouse, titmouse), dice (when used as the plural of die), pence (a plural of penny, with compounds like sixpence that now tend to be taken as singulars). In the absence of specific exceptional treatment in style guides, the possessives of these plurals are formed by adding an apostrophe and an s in the standard way: seven titmice's tails were found, the dice's last fall was a seven, his few pence's value was not enough to buy bread. These would often be rephrased, where possible: the last fall of the dice was a seven.
Basic rule (compound nouns)
Compound nouns have their singular possessives formed with an apostrophe and an added s, in accordance with the rules given above: the Attorney-General's husband; the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports' prerogative; this Minister for Justice's intervention; her father-in-law's new wife.

In such examples, the plurals are formed with an s that does not occur at the end: e.g., Attorneys-General. A problem therefore arises with the possessive plurals of these compounds. Sources that rule on the matter appear to favour the following forms, in which there is both an s added to form the plural, and a separate s added for the possessive: the Attorneys-General's husbands; successive Ministers for Justice's interventions; their fathers-in-law's new wives. Because these constructions stretch the resources of punctuation beyond comfort, in practice they are normally reworded: interventions by successive Ministers for Justice.
With other punctuation; compounds with pronouns
If the word or compound includes, or even ends with, a punctuation mark, an apostrophe and an s are still added in the usual way: Awaye!'s Paulette Whitten recorded Bob Wilson's story; Washington, D.C.'s museums, assuming that the prevailing style requires full stops in D.C.

If the word or compound already includes a possessive apostrophe, a double possessive results: Tom's sisters' careers; the head of marketing's husband's preference; the master of foxhounds' best dog's death. Some style guides, while allowing that these constructions are possible, advise rephrasing: the preference of the head of marketing's husband. If an original apostrophe, or apostrophe with s, occurs at the end, it is left by itself to do double duty: Our employees are better paid than McDonald's employees; Standard & Poor's indexes are widely used; the 5uu's first album (the fixed forms of McDonald's and Standard & Poor's already include possessive apostrophes; 5uu's already has a non-possessive apostrophe before its final s). No noun or noun phrase ever includes two apostrophes at its end. For similar cases involving geographical names, see below.
By extended application of the principles stated above, the possessives of all phrases whose wording is fixed are formed in the same way:
"Us and Them"'s inclusion on the album The Dark Side of the Moon
You Am I's latest CD
The 69'ers' last drummer, Tom Callaghan (only the second apostrophe is possessive)
His 'n' Hers' first track is called "Joyriders".
Was She's success greater, or King Solomon's Mines'?
For complications with foreign phrases and titles

The wrong way to spell and apostrophe abuse...
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"Proelium Comminus Auctoritate" "Sometimes the light at the end of the tunnel is a muzzle flash."
4 years 23 weeks ago, 10:09 AM

HampsterW

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Reaper,

don't you mean "grammar lesson"??? LOL!

Change you can truly believe in comes from the barrel of a gun---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ron Paul 2012----Vote the bastards out!---------------------------------
4 years 23 weeks ago, 11:13 AM

Reaper308

Reaper308's picture


Rank:
Secretary of Defense
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6226
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Jun 2008
Location:
Airstrip One, Oceania
shit...

give me the dunce hat and I'll go to the corner. this always happens to me!

"Proelium Comminus Auctoritate" "Sometimes the light at the end of the tunnel is a muzzle flash."
Anonymous's picture
Posted by: Anonymous
5 years 17 weeks ago
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